Research Topic

Nutrition and Exercise Immunology

About this Research Topic

The immune system is responsive to the physiological stress imposed by the exercise workload. Moderate exercise bouts stimulate the ongoing exchange of immune cells between lymphoid tissues and the circulation, improving immunosurveillance and immune defense activity. The net effect of regular moderate exercise training is a decrease in prevalence of acute respiratory illness, reduced systemic inflammation, and a delay in the onset of immunosenescence and tumorigenesis. In contrast, high exercise workloads and the associated physiological and metabolic stress are linked to transient immune impairment, inflammation, oxidative stress, muscle damage, and an elevated illness risk.

Various immunonutrition strategies are being explored to counter the physiological stress experienced by athletes. Until recently, the countermeasure effect of nutrition on exercise-induced stress and immune dysfunction was measured using a few targeted outcomes, but increasingly the focus has shifted to multi-omics approaches. This paradigm shift has been driven by exponential advances in measurement technologies and bioinformatics approaches. Immunometabolism is an evolving field of scientific endeavor that merges immunology and metabolism, and has provided a valuable context when evaluating the influence of dietary interventions on exercise-induced immune dysfunction. Metabolomics, lipidomics, and proteomics, provide a system-wide view of the metabolic response to exercise by simultaneously measuring and identifying a large number of small molecule metabolites, lipids, and proteins. Many of these are involved with immune function and regulation, and are sensitive to dietary influences.

The goal of this Research Topic is to provide novel insights into the influence of nutrition on exercise-induced immune function and related outcomes. Welcome subtopics include (but are not limited to):
Exercise-induced changes on inflammation and immunity, and interactive effects of:
• Carbohydrates, sugars
• Proteins, amino acids
• Fats, fish oil
• Micronutrients, vitamins, minerals
• Phytochemicals, polyphenols, flavonoids
• Plant extracts
• Dietary fiber, beta glucans
• Prebiotics, probiotics
• Dietary supplements
• Herbal supplements


Keywords: Immunology, Inflammation, Metabolomics, Proteomics, Lipidomics, Genomics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The immune system is responsive to the physiological stress imposed by the exercise workload. Moderate exercise bouts stimulate the ongoing exchange of immune cells between lymphoid tissues and the circulation, improving immunosurveillance and immune defense activity. The net effect of regular moderate exercise training is a decrease in prevalence of acute respiratory illness, reduced systemic inflammation, and a delay in the onset of immunosenescence and tumorigenesis. In contrast, high exercise workloads and the associated physiological and metabolic stress are linked to transient immune impairment, inflammation, oxidative stress, muscle damage, and an elevated illness risk.

Various immunonutrition strategies are being explored to counter the physiological stress experienced by athletes. Until recently, the countermeasure effect of nutrition on exercise-induced stress and immune dysfunction was measured using a few targeted outcomes, but increasingly the focus has shifted to multi-omics approaches. This paradigm shift has been driven by exponential advances in measurement technologies and bioinformatics approaches. Immunometabolism is an evolving field of scientific endeavor that merges immunology and metabolism, and has provided a valuable context when evaluating the influence of dietary interventions on exercise-induced immune dysfunction. Metabolomics, lipidomics, and proteomics, provide a system-wide view of the metabolic response to exercise by simultaneously measuring and identifying a large number of small molecule metabolites, lipids, and proteins. Many of these are involved with immune function and regulation, and are sensitive to dietary influences.

The goal of this Research Topic is to provide novel insights into the influence of nutrition on exercise-induced immune function and related outcomes. Welcome subtopics include (but are not limited to):
Exercise-induced changes on inflammation and immunity, and interactive effects of:
• Carbohydrates, sugars
• Proteins, amino acids
• Fats, fish oil
• Micronutrients, vitamins, minerals
• Phytochemicals, polyphenols, flavonoids
• Plant extracts
• Dietary fiber, beta glucans
• Prebiotics, probiotics
• Dietary supplements
• Herbal supplements


Keywords: Immunology, Inflammation, Metabolomics, Proteomics, Lipidomics, Genomics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 September 2020 Abstract
31 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 September 2020 Abstract
31 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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