Research Topic

Effects of Driver Support Systems on Cognitive and Affective Processes Underlying Driving Behaviors

About this Research Topic

In recent decades, much effort has been devoted to promoting road safety. Scientists contribute to this aim by providing knowledge about psychological factors that affect human behavior on the road, such as decision making, proneness to risk, sensation seeking, aggression, and a variety of personality characteristics that modulate driving habits.

Recently, considerable efforts have been devoted to developing tools that modify driving habits to enhance road safety. This has led to the release of various driver support systems that collect performance data. Such systems deliver feedback in real-time and offline to reduce risky behaviors and help drivers adopt safer driving styles. In this field, performance variable analysis of on-road and simulated driving might provide relevant insights. Currently, several technologies are available, but the way they affect psychological mechanisms underlying driving behaviors have not yet been fully explored.

The Research Topic is strictly linked to the concept of driving style since assistance devices are supposed to affect relatively stable driving habits. Consequently, discussions and conceptualizations about how driving styles are modeled and the extent in which they can be modified play an important role in research aimed at investigating the effectiveness of driver assistance systems and the persistence of the effects they induce.
This Research Topic is aimed at providing a wide framework to integrate evidence related to driver support system effectiveness in terms of driving performance, with studies that cast light on cognitive and psychophysiological processes involved in driving, especially attention and hazard perception.

Studies focusing on feedback characteristics and their relationships with behavioral modulation, as well as the persistence of drivers’ induced performance changes over time, are especially encouraged. Contributions regarding the effects of these systems on motorcycle and car driving are also welcomed.

Contributions (including Original Research, Systematic Review, Methods, Review, Mini Review, Hypothesis and Theory, and Brief Research Report) addressing the following issues are especially (but not exclusively) recommended:
• Psychological processes implied in learning to drive safely.
• Effectiveness of an alert system on driving behavior.
• Methods to model driving habits or driving styles.
• Persistence of the effect of Driver Assistance Systems.
• Studying individual differences among the road users related to their driving style
• Effect of Precision Teaching on driving behaviors and the underlying psychological processes.

The overall aim is to provide suggestions that improve road safety by affecting human behavior and contribute to the development of effective safety support systems for prevention and training purposes.

*Guest Editor, Dr. Mariaelena Tagliabue received financial support from Assicurazioni Generali and Garmin Switzerland. All other Guest Editors declare no other competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.*


Keywords: driver support systems, driving style modification, risk perception, attention, psychophysiological processes, real-time driving feedback, off-line driving feedback, driving behavior changes, long-lasting effect of ADAS effectiveness.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In recent decades, much effort has been devoted to promoting road safety. Scientists contribute to this aim by providing knowledge about psychological factors that affect human behavior on the road, such as decision making, proneness to risk, sensation seeking, aggression, and a variety of personality characteristics that modulate driving habits.

Recently, considerable efforts have been devoted to developing tools that modify driving habits to enhance road safety. This has led to the release of various driver support systems that collect performance data. Such systems deliver feedback in real-time and offline to reduce risky behaviors and help drivers adopt safer driving styles. In this field, performance variable analysis of on-road and simulated driving might provide relevant insights. Currently, several technologies are available, but the way they affect psychological mechanisms underlying driving behaviors have not yet been fully explored.

The Research Topic is strictly linked to the concept of driving style since assistance devices are supposed to affect relatively stable driving habits. Consequently, discussions and conceptualizations about how driving styles are modeled and the extent in which they can be modified play an important role in research aimed at investigating the effectiveness of driver assistance systems and the persistence of the effects they induce.
This Research Topic is aimed at providing a wide framework to integrate evidence related to driver support system effectiveness in terms of driving performance, with studies that cast light on cognitive and psychophysiological processes involved in driving, especially attention and hazard perception.

Studies focusing on feedback characteristics and their relationships with behavioral modulation, as well as the persistence of drivers’ induced performance changes over time, are especially encouraged. Contributions regarding the effects of these systems on motorcycle and car driving are also welcomed.

Contributions (including Original Research, Systematic Review, Methods, Review, Mini Review, Hypothesis and Theory, and Brief Research Report) addressing the following issues are especially (but not exclusively) recommended:
• Psychological processes implied in learning to drive safely.
• Effectiveness of an alert system on driving behavior.
• Methods to model driving habits or driving styles.
• Persistence of the effect of Driver Assistance Systems.
• Studying individual differences among the road users related to their driving style
• Effect of Precision Teaching on driving behaviors and the underlying psychological processes.

The overall aim is to provide suggestions that improve road safety by affecting human behavior and contribute to the development of effective safety support systems for prevention and training purposes.

*Guest Editor, Dr. Mariaelena Tagliabue received financial support from Assicurazioni Generali and Garmin Switzerland. All other Guest Editors declare no other competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.*


Keywords: driver support systems, driving style modification, risk perception, attention, psychophysiological processes, real-time driving feedback, off-line driving feedback, driving behavior changes, long-lasting effect of ADAS effectiveness.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

15 June 2020 Abstract
23 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

15 June 2020 Abstract
23 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..