Research Topic

Biomimetic Materials for Tissue Regenerations

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In tissue engineering, the ultimate goal is to engineer an entire functioning organ that requires building complex structures of different tissue types. A three-dimensional scaffold seeded with desired cell types. In order to resemble the natural formations of the organs, cells have to be correctly located in ...

In tissue engineering, the ultimate goal is to engineer an entire functioning organ that requires building complex structures of different tissue types. A three-dimensional scaffold seeded with desired cell types. In order to resemble the natural formations of the organs, cells have to be correctly located in relation to one another. It has been shown in cocultures that cells have the capability of spontaneous tissue-like organization when seeded into the scaffold. The ideal scaffolds should have an interconnected porous structure, well-designed pore size and adequate porosity to allow cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, effective bioactive agents and nutrient exchange are crucial during new tissue development. Thus the individual organ cell is a specific mechanism for the construction or regeneration of the cells.

Artificial scaffolds have been applied and used as supporting structures for cell cultures as well as for the domination of cell growth in the repair of impaired tissues or organs. During the cell regeneration, the scaffold temporarily helps in cell regeneration and gradually biodegrade either in the course of the healing process or after, and a new tissue with a desired shape and properties is produced. The challenge of tissue engineering is to mimic what happens in nature. Attempts are being made to engineer in vitro practically every tissue and organ in the body. Work is proceeding in creating tissue-engineered liver, nerve, kidney, intestine, pancreas, and even heart muscle and valves. In the area of connective tissues, work has been ongoing worldwide for many years in the engineering of tendon, ligament, bone, and cartilage. Recently, the number of reports was succeeded in skin, bladder, airway, and bone, where tissue-engineered constructs have been used successfully in patients. This Research Topic is the collection of body organ regeneration materials and their cell adhesion and migration for the development and regeneration of tissues.

Biomimetic materials promise to advance in current understanding of organ regeneration and repair by providing tools to recapitulate and monitor relevant properties of cellular - microenvironment interactions. Although cell adhesion, migration, and development aspects of tissues have shown success in the clinic, better, more intricate models are needed to understand drivers of tissue repair and regeneration fully. Tissue engineering bears tremendous potential toward gaining a complete understanding of the underlying biological and physical mechanisms advancing the treatment of damaged organs. The following Research Topic “Bio-mimetic materials for tissue regenerations” discusses examples of progress toward this objective.

• Bio-mimicking scaffold materials for tissue regeneration
• Cell adhesion to scaffold materials
• Role of materials for the migration of cells
• Mechanisms of cell growth for organ development


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