Research Topic

Amelogenesis Imperfecta

About this Research Topic

Dental anomalies occur as a result of complex interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors during tooth development. The phenotype of a tooth may change in terms of number, type, size, shape, structure depending on current epigenetic factors and dental developmental stages.

Hereditary enamel defects can be either syndromic or non-syndromic. Mature enamel is formed by a series of events: the synthesis of enamel matrix, calcification, and maturation. The defects arising from errors in any of these steps can be categorized as one of the three major types of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI): hypoplastic, hypocalcified, or hypomatured. The hereditary patterns and clinical phenotypes presented in previous studies allow the present studies to focus on the molecular genetic etiology in persons newly identified as having AI. A careful examination of the clinical phenotype and hereditary pattern via a detailed family history can help prioritize candidate gene(s) for mutational screening.

The main aim of this Research Topic is to determine additional etiological factors that cause AI and to identify other genes that can be associated with AI. We are also interested in mechanistic work on the known described mutations. The bulk of this work will allow for steps to be taken for early diagnosis and treatment for this dental anomaly in the future.

Relevant themes for this Research Topic include (but are not limited to):
- Dental anomalies
- Amelogenesis imperfecta
- Etiological factors
- Gene mutations


Keywords: Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Dental Anomalies, Mutations


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Dental anomalies occur as a result of complex interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors during tooth development. The phenotype of a tooth may change in terms of number, type, size, shape, structure depending on current epigenetic factors and dental developmental stages.

Hereditary enamel defects can be either syndromic or non-syndromic. Mature enamel is formed by a series of events: the synthesis of enamel matrix, calcification, and maturation. The defects arising from errors in any of these steps can be categorized as one of the three major types of amelogenesis imperfecta (AI): hypoplastic, hypocalcified, or hypomatured. The hereditary patterns and clinical phenotypes presented in previous studies allow the present studies to focus on the molecular genetic etiology in persons newly identified as having AI. A careful examination of the clinical phenotype and hereditary pattern via a detailed family history can help prioritize candidate gene(s) for mutational screening.

The main aim of this Research Topic is to determine additional etiological factors that cause AI and to identify other genes that can be associated with AI. We are also interested in mechanistic work on the known described mutations. The bulk of this work will allow for steps to be taken for early diagnosis and treatment for this dental anomaly in the future.

Relevant themes for this Research Topic include (but are not limited to):
- Dental anomalies
- Amelogenesis imperfecta
- Etiological factors
- Gene mutations


Keywords: Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Dental Anomalies, Mutations


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 October 2020 Abstract
29 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 October 2020 Abstract
29 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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