Research Topic

Pathogenesis of tuberculosis and paratuberculosis

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Infection with pathogenic mycobacteria causes serious illness in both humans and animals. In humans, infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is considered one of the most vicious scours and used to be termed, the white plaque, an indication of its paramount impact on human health and ill-fate of ...

Infection with pathogenic mycobacteria causes serious illness in both humans and animals. In humans, infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is considered one of the most vicious scours and used to be termed, the white plaque, an indication of its paramount impact on human health and ill-fate of infected individuals. In animals, infection with M. bovis was so prevalent that almost 50% of farm-raised animals were infected in the so called “Western world” where we maintained statistics, at the turn of the last century. Despite the prevalence of animal
infections with M. bovis has declined precipitously, another pathogenic mycobacteria, M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis for short) has replaced M. bovis infection rates under the current farm conditions. On the cellular level, infections with M. tuberculosis and M. paratuberculosis are very similar while their pathogenesis inside respective hosts is completely different. For example, M. tuberculosis infection is acquired through aerosolization and targets lung tissues while M. paratuberculosis infection is acquired through oral route and targets the intestine and lymphatic tissues. Currently, several aspects of cellular invasion, virulence, persistence of these pathogens as well as the host responses to them remain unclear.

In this Research Topic issue, we plan to highlight advances in the pathogenesis of both diseases investigating basic, molecular, genomics, proteomics and even epidemiological aspects of tuberculosis and paratuberculosis. We are also open for other, not listed, research areas as long as they can help in improving our understanding of the pathogenesis of these important diseases. In my humble opinion, this issue can have a great impact on the future direction of research on two of the most important scours that affect humans and animals.

Abstract Submission Deadline: 15 March 2011
Full Article Submission Deadline: 15 June 2011


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