Research Topic

Climatic Compound and Cascading Extremes in a Changing Climate: Variability, Predictability, and Causality

About this Research Topic

Anthropogenic global warming has made potentially dangerous shifts in climate and ocean dynamic systems, leading to severe and frequent climatic extremes, such as drought, flooding, heatwaves, wildfires, and hurricanes. In such a warming climate, occurrence of these climate extremes at the same time or sequentially trigger devastating impacts beyond what each of these hazards creates in isolation. These combinations of two or more climate extremes (such as hot and dry conditions, rainfall and wave-driven floods from tropical cyclones, and co-occurrence of heatwaves, drought, and wildfires) are known as compound extremes.
These compound and cascading extremes are critical for a broad suite of climate-sensitive concerns, including climate and coastal resiliency, global water security, human health, infrastructure resiliency, supply chains, poverty vulnerability, disaster preparedness and recovery, and weather insurance and reinsurance. Although much has been learned on the impact of climate change on different types of individual climate extremes using univariate metrics, the use of multivariate frameworks to capture changes in compound extremes under a warming climate has remained a persistent challenge.

This Research Topic aims to present recent scientific findings on the impact of anthropogenic climate change on the nature and dynamics of these climatic compounds and cascading extremes under a changing climate, and how future global warming may intensify their damaging effects. Therefore, we invite researchers to present their new findings in a broad range of areas related to the following topics:
• Modelling the co-variability and risk assessment of different climatic compound and cascading extremes related to drought, heatwaves, wildfires, floods, rainfall, and tropical cyclones under a changing climate.
• Development of dynamic models to detect temporal and spatial changes and variability in dependence structure of multidimensional climatic hazards/drivers under a future warming climate.
• Attributing compound extreme events to climate change under a warming climate.
• Development of new multivariate time series modelling and intelligence techniques to better understand changes in dynamics, memory and persistency, and volatility of compound and cascading extremes.
• Projection of climatic compound dynamic systems and their impacts on coupled human-natural systems under a future warming climate.
• Mechanisms of compound and cascading weather and climate extremes.

All statistical, probabilistic, and intelligence-based methodologies, which rely on ground-based and reanalysis data sources, remote sensing observations, and climate model simulations are welcome.


Keywords: anthropogenic global warming, climate change, cascading extremes, multivariate, modelling, compound extremes, global warming, risk assessment


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Anthropogenic global warming has made potentially dangerous shifts in climate and ocean dynamic systems, leading to severe and frequent climatic extremes, such as drought, flooding, heatwaves, wildfires, and hurricanes. In such a warming climate, occurrence of these climate extremes at the same time or sequentially trigger devastating impacts beyond what each of these hazards creates in isolation. These combinations of two or more climate extremes (such as hot and dry conditions, rainfall and wave-driven floods from tropical cyclones, and co-occurrence of heatwaves, drought, and wildfires) are known as compound extremes.
These compound and cascading extremes are critical for a broad suite of climate-sensitive concerns, including climate and coastal resiliency, global water security, human health, infrastructure resiliency, supply chains, poverty vulnerability, disaster preparedness and recovery, and weather insurance and reinsurance. Although much has been learned on the impact of climate change on different types of individual climate extremes using univariate metrics, the use of multivariate frameworks to capture changes in compound extremes under a warming climate has remained a persistent challenge.

This Research Topic aims to present recent scientific findings on the impact of anthropogenic climate change on the nature and dynamics of these climatic compounds and cascading extremes under a changing climate, and how future global warming may intensify their damaging effects. Therefore, we invite researchers to present their new findings in a broad range of areas related to the following topics:
• Modelling the co-variability and risk assessment of different climatic compound and cascading extremes related to drought, heatwaves, wildfires, floods, rainfall, and tropical cyclones under a changing climate.
• Development of dynamic models to detect temporal and spatial changes and variability in dependence structure of multidimensional climatic hazards/drivers under a future warming climate.
• Attributing compound extreme events to climate change under a warming climate.
• Development of new multivariate time series modelling and intelligence techniques to better understand changes in dynamics, memory and persistency, and volatility of compound and cascading extremes.
• Projection of climatic compound dynamic systems and their impacts on coupled human-natural systems under a future warming climate.
• Mechanisms of compound and cascading weather and climate extremes.

All statistical, probabilistic, and intelligence-based methodologies, which rely on ground-based and reanalysis data sources, remote sensing observations, and climate model simulations are welcome.


Keywords: anthropogenic global warming, climate change, cascading extremes, multivariate, modelling, compound extremes, global warming, risk assessment


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 December 2020 Abstract
20 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 December 2020 Abstract
20 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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