Research Topic

Human Intestinal Permeability, Mucosal Inflammation and Diet

About this Research Topic

There is converging and increasing evidence for the role of abnormal intestinal permeability in the origin and development of a growing number of human gastrointestinal and extraintestinal inflammatory disorders. Among the multiple factors involved in the regulation of intestinal permeability, diet emerges as one of the most relevant because it has been also linked to the generation of symptoms in many gastrointestinal diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying diet-induced changes in intestinal permeability in humans, and its connection to the appearance and severity of clinical symptoms require further elucidation. Advances in intestinal permeability research will enable better treatment and management options as well as will contribute to improving the quality of life of those affected by these common disorders.

Thanks to ready access to sugar permeability tests, altered human intestinal permeability is now commonly diagnosed among individuals presenting with a variety of gastrointestinal and even non-gastrointestinal complaints and is increasingly implicated, in lay press and media in the causation of a diverse array of disorders. Its definition, however, remains controversial and true prevalence, accordingly, undefined. The purpose of this series of articles, therefore, was to critically review current concepts of human intestinal permeability (including pathophysiology, symptomatology, clinical consequences, diagnosis and treatment), with particular focus on the role of diet, define unanswered questions and provide a road map towards their resolution by addressing the following subtopics:

1. The role of intestinal permeability in nutrition and disease and vice versa.
2. Inflammatory and microbiota-related regulation of the intestinal epithelial barrier.
3. The role of intestinal permeability in gastrointestinal functional and motor disorders.
4. The role of intestinal permeability in other gastrointestinal disorders and methods to evaluate intestinal permeability.
5. Present and future therapeutic approaches to barrier dysfunction.

This will be achieved by leading and renowned experts in the field. Relevant Original Research and Review articles will be also considered.


Keywords: Permeability, Inflamamtion, Gut, Nutrition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

There is converging and increasing evidence for the role of abnormal intestinal permeability in the origin and development of a growing number of human gastrointestinal and extraintestinal inflammatory disorders. Among the multiple factors involved in the regulation of intestinal permeability, diet emerges as one of the most relevant because it has been also linked to the generation of symptoms in many gastrointestinal diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying diet-induced changes in intestinal permeability in humans, and its connection to the appearance and severity of clinical symptoms require further elucidation. Advances in intestinal permeability research will enable better treatment and management options as well as will contribute to improving the quality of life of those affected by these common disorders.

Thanks to ready access to sugar permeability tests, altered human intestinal permeability is now commonly diagnosed among individuals presenting with a variety of gastrointestinal and even non-gastrointestinal complaints and is increasingly implicated, in lay press and media in the causation of a diverse array of disorders. Its definition, however, remains controversial and true prevalence, accordingly, undefined. The purpose of this series of articles, therefore, was to critically review current concepts of human intestinal permeability (including pathophysiology, symptomatology, clinical consequences, diagnosis and treatment), with particular focus on the role of diet, define unanswered questions and provide a road map towards their resolution by addressing the following subtopics:

1. The role of intestinal permeability in nutrition and disease and vice versa.
2. Inflammatory and microbiota-related regulation of the intestinal epithelial barrier.
3. The role of intestinal permeability in gastrointestinal functional and motor disorders.
4. The role of intestinal permeability in other gastrointestinal disorders and methods to evaluate intestinal permeability.
5. Present and future therapeutic approaches to barrier dysfunction.

This will be achieved by leading and renowned experts in the field. Relevant Original Research and Review articles will be also considered.


Keywords: Permeability, Inflamamtion, Gut, Nutrition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2020 Abstract
31 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2020 Abstract
31 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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