Research Topic

Host-Microbiome Interactions and Influence on Performance During Acute Environmental, Nutritional, Physical, and Cognitive Stress Volume II

About this Research Topic

This Research Topic is part of the Host-Microbiome Interactions and Influence on Performance During Acute Environmental, Nutritional, Physical, and Cognitive Stress series:
Host-Microbiome Interactions and Influence on Performance During Acute Environmental, Nutritional, Physical, and Cognitive Stress


The intestine ensures the digestion and absorption of nutrients and modulates host metabolism and physiology. The intestine also houses the gut microbiome, a diverse and dynamic microbial community which includes bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The gut microbiome assists in the digestion process, produces vitamins, defends against foreign pathogens, acts as an important barrier to protect the intestinal epithelium, signals the brain, and influences immune function. Thus, the relationship between intestinal function and the gut microbiome is bi-directional. Various types of acute stressors such as exercise, sleep deprivation, cold/heat stress, high altitude, and dietary changes can alter intestinal function, and potentially the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiome as well as host response. In so doing, effects of stress on human performance may be mediated, in part, through the bi-directional interaction between the host intestinal environment and the gut microbiome.

This Research Topic welcomes papers utilizing cellular, animal, or human models that address the above stressors in the context of host-microbe interactions. Sub-topics may include, but are not limited to: effects on microbial communities, gut-brain signaling, changes in the intestinal epithelial barrier, immune cell response, as well as nutritional mitigation strategies (e.g. pre/probiotics). Review and original research articles will be considered. This Research Topic hopes to foster discussion and potential strategies that leverage intestinal-gut microbiome interactions to optimize stress responses and human performance.


Keywords: microbiome, stress, performance, intestine, immune


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

This Research Topic is part of the Host-Microbiome Interactions and Influence on Performance During Acute Environmental, Nutritional, Physical, and Cognitive Stress series:
Host-Microbiome Interactions and Influence on Performance During Acute Environmental, Nutritional, Physical, and Cognitive Stress


The intestine ensures the digestion and absorption of nutrients and modulates host metabolism and physiology. The intestine also houses the gut microbiome, a diverse and dynamic microbial community which includes bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The gut microbiome assists in the digestion process, produces vitamins, defends against foreign pathogens, acts as an important barrier to protect the intestinal epithelium, signals the brain, and influences immune function. Thus, the relationship between intestinal function and the gut microbiome is bi-directional. Various types of acute stressors such as exercise, sleep deprivation, cold/heat stress, high altitude, and dietary changes can alter intestinal function, and potentially the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiome as well as host response. In so doing, effects of stress on human performance may be mediated, in part, through the bi-directional interaction between the host intestinal environment and the gut microbiome.

This Research Topic welcomes papers utilizing cellular, animal, or human models that address the above stressors in the context of host-microbe interactions. Sub-topics may include, but are not limited to: effects on microbial communities, gut-brain signaling, changes in the intestinal epithelial barrier, immune cell response, as well as nutritional mitigation strategies (e.g. pre/probiotics). Review and original research articles will be considered. This Research Topic hopes to foster discussion and potential strategies that leverage intestinal-gut microbiome interactions to optimize stress responses and human performance.


Keywords: microbiome, stress, performance, intestine, immune


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

18 December 2020 Abstract
23 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

18 December 2020 Abstract
23 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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