Research Topic

The Use of Image and Imaging Flow Cytometry as a Tool to Study Host-Pathogen Interactions

About this Research Topic

In order to develop effective therapeutics to any infectious disease the scientific community must study pathogens, learn how they cause disease, and how they interact with their host species. It is therefore important for scientists to use all the tools available to study host pathogen interactions. Image cytometry is an important tool in advancing this field and has been an established technology for many decades. Imaging flow cytometry was introduced to the scientific community in 2005 and has grown an established and well-respected user base. Over the past 15 year period this technique has established itself as a key technology for the study of the single cell on a population level. The technology is now widely accepted in research where quantitative spatial and morphological measurements are required and has become a powerful tool in the study of host pathogen interactions.
The goal of this Research Topic is to showcase the utility of this technique in both the study of pathogens and of host-pathogen interactions. Similarly, image cytometry is also an important tool for studying host pathogen interaction. As such, a secondary goal of this research topic would be to encourage the dual use of image and imaging flow cytometry to increase the robustness of research into this area, and to identify novel image cytometry methods that can be applied to this field of study. Subject areas that are of interest include (but are not limited too):
1. New methods in imaging flow cytometry to study host pathogen interactions (virus, bacterial, parasitic and fungal are all welcome).
2. New analysis techniques in both imaging flow cytometry and image cytometry for host pathogen interactions.
3. Novel in vitro techniques to study host pathogen interactions that utilise image or imaging flow cytometry as data capture and analysis techniques.
4. Use of imaging flow cytometry to directly study small objects such as bacteria, viruses and extracellular vesicles with an infectious disease aspect.


Keywords: Imaging flow cytometry, host response, bacteria, viruses, parasites


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In order to develop effective therapeutics to any infectious disease the scientific community must study pathogens, learn how they cause disease, and how they interact with their host species. It is therefore important for scientists to use all the tools available to study host pathogen interactions. Image cytometry is an important tool in advancing this field and has been an established technology for many decades. Imaging flow cytometry was introduced to the scientific community in 2005 and has grown an established and well-respected user base. Over the past 15 year period this technique has established itself as a key technology for the study of the single cell on a population level. The technology is now widely accepted in research where quantitative spatial and morphological measurements are required and has become a powerful tool in the study of host pathogen interactions.
The goal of this Research Topic is to showcase the utility of this technique in both the study of pathogens and of host-pathogen interactions. Similarly, image cytometry is also an important tool for studying host pathogen interaction. As such, a secondary goal of this research topic would be to encourage the dual use of image and imaging flow cytometry to increase the robustness of research into this area, and to identify novel image cytometry methods that can be applied to this field of study. Subject areas that are of interest include (but are not limited too):
1. New methods in imaging flow cytometry to study host pathogen interactions (virus, bacterial, parasitic and fungal are all welcome).
2. New analysis techniques in both imaging flow cytometry and image cytometry for host pathogen interactions.
3. Novel in vitro techniques to study host pathogen interactions that utilise image or imaging flow cytometry as data capture and analysis techniques.
4. Use of imaging flow cytometry to directly study small objects such as bacteria, viruses and extracellular vesicles with an infectious disease aspect.


Keywords: Imaging flow cytometry, host response, bacteria, viruses, parasites


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 January 2021 Abstract
15 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 January 2021 Abstract
15 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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