Research Topic

Ladybirds: Conservation, Ecology and Interactions with Other Organisms

About this Research Topic

Ladybirds (family Coccinellidae) are important, primarily predaceous beetles. They play a crucial role in the regulation of insect herbivore populations in natural and managed systems.

In the last 30 years, populations of many formerly common native species of ladybird have declined in several parts of the world—including North America, Europe, and others. This happened together with increasing populations of especially two invasive alien species: Coccinella septempunctata (seven-spotted ladybird) in North America and Harmonia axyridis (multicolored ladybird) globally. For this reason, it is crucial to prioritize conservation efforts of locally native ladybirds, not only by collecting existing information, but also by forming active collaborations among scientists, citizen scientists, and conservation practitioners to share information, coordinate data collection, and disseminate results efficiently.

Recent years have seen a surge in studies of the natural enemies of ladybirds. Published work has ranged from collaborative reviews and alpha-taxonomy to laboratory bioassays and species descriptions based on a phylogenetic framework. Continued efforts in this area of research will help to better understand how populations of invasive ladybirds may be regulated.

In this Research Topic, we welcome papers that explore the following areas of research:
• Community composition and functional traits in forests versus urbanized areas
• Interactions with natural enemies
• Phylogenetic reconstructions and species descriptions
• Integrative pest management strategies
• Initiatives to incorporate citizen science data into ladybird research
• Long-term biodiversity studies
• Key conservation issues facing ladybirds and restoration efforts

Image courtesy of Nuno Bicudo


Keywords: Citizen science, Diversity, Insect Recovery, Invasive Species, Natural Enemy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Ladybirds (family Coccinellidae) are important, primarily predaceous beetles. They play a crucial role in the regulation of insect herbivore populations in natural and managed systems.

In the last 30 years, populations of many formerly common native species of ladybird have declined in several parts of the world—including North America, Europe, and others. This happened together with increasing populations of especially two invasive alien species: Coccinella septempunctata (seven-spotted ladybird) in North America and Harmonia axyridis (multicolored ladybird) globally. For this reason, it is crucial to prioritize conservation efforts of locally native ladybirds, not only by collecting existing information, but also by forming active collaborations among scientists, citizen scientists, and conservation practitioners to share information, coordinate data collection, and disseminate results efficiently.

Recent years have seen a surge in studies of the natural enemies of ladybirds. Published work has ranged from collaborative reviews and alpha-taxonomy to laboratory bioassays and species descriptions based on a phylogenetic framework. Continued efforts in this area of research will help to better understand how populations of invasive ladybirds may be regulated.

In this Research Topic, we welcome papers that explore the following areas of research:
• Community composition and functional traits in forests versus urbanized areas
• Interactions with natural enemies
• Phylogenetic reconstructions and species descriptions
• Integrative pest management strategies
• Initiatives to incorporate citizen science data into ladybird research
• Long-term biodiversity studies
• Key conservation issues facing ladybirds and restoration efforts

Image courtesy of Nuno Bicudo


Keywords: Citizen science, Diversity, Insect Recovery, Invasive Species, Natural Enemy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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