Research Topic

Regional and Time-specific Strategies of Neurogenesis and Neuronal Differentiation Across Evolution

About this Research Topic

During nervous system development, neuronal progenitors divide, specify, and differentiate to give rise to a great variety of cell types. The generation of diverse brain structures relies to a great extent on region- and time-specific mechanisms of neurogenesis, cell type specification and differentiation, which in many cases differ throughout evolution.

Many studies have been focused on the molecular mechanisms of neuronal specification and terminal differentiation. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of neurogenesis has been mainly focused on the pallium (prospective cerebral cortex in mammals). Likewise, most of our knowledge about how neurogenesis occurs and is regulated, comes from a handful of vertebrate model organisms. To grasp how distinct nervous systems form and how they have evolved, we first need to understand the variety of strategies used to generate neurons (and glial cells).

In this Research Topic, we will welcome Original research, General Commentary, or Review articles on mechanisms of neurogenesis, neuronal specification and terminal differentiation in different nervous system regions, from early development to senescence and adulthood, in classical and unconventional vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms, as well as in vitro models.

1. Authors can explore mechanisms of cell division of neural progenitors and core regulatory complexes involved in neuronal/glial specification and differentiation.
2. Articles addressing how neurons become organized into functional structures by changes in cell shape and cell migration, how neural tissue growth is regulated, how the nervous system repair after injury or how impaired neurogenesis relates to neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative disorders, will be also considered.
3. Articles can be focused on specific nervous system divisions on their derived regions or cell layers, specific developmental periods or species.
4. Articles focused on species, brain regions or contexts comparisons (i.e. development versus adult and aging brain, direct versus indirect neurogenesis, constitutive versus regenerative neurogenesis, constitutive versus induced neurogenesis) are particularly welcome.


Keywords: Neurogenesis, Neuronal Differentiation, Brain evolution, Nervous systems evolution, Regeneration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

During nervous system development, neuronal progenitors divide, specify, and differentiate to give rise to a great variety of cell types. The generation of diverse brain structures relies to a great extent on region- and time-specific mechanisms of neurogenesis, cell type specification and differentiation, which in many cases differ throughout evolution.

Many studies have been focused on the molecular mechanisms of neuronal specification and terminal differentiation. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of neurogenesis has been mainly focused on the pallium (prospective cerebral cortex in mammals). Likewise, most of our knowledge about how neurogenesis occurs and is regulated, comes from a handful of vertebrate model organisms. To grasp how distinct nervous systems form and how they have evolved, we first need to understand the variety of strategies used to generate neurons (and glial cells).

In this Research Topic, we will welcome Original research, General Commentary, or Review articles on mechanisms of neurogenesis, neuronal specification and terminal differentiation in different nervous system regions, from early development to senescence and adulthood, in classical and unconventional vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms, as well as in vitro models.

1. Authors can explore mechanisms of cell division of neural progenitors and core regulatory complexes involved in neuronal/glial specification and differentiation.
2. Articles addressing how neurons become organized into functional structures by changes in cell shape and cell migration, how neural tissue growth is regulated, how the nervous system repair after injury or how impaired neurogenesis relates to neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative disorders, will be also considered.
3. Articles can be focused on specific nervous system divisions on their derived regions or cell layers, specific developmental periods or species.
4. Articles focused on species, brain regions or contexts comparisons (i.e. development versus adult and aging brain, direct versus indirect neurogenesis, constitutive versus regenerative neurogenesis, constitutive versus induced neurogenesis) are particularly welcome.


Keywords: Neurogenesis, Neuronal Differentiation, Brain evolution, Nervous systems evolution, Regeneration


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

13 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

13 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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