Research Topic

Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Embryonic and Adult Myogenesis

About this Research Topic

Skeletal muscle is the most abundant adult tissue in vertebrates and possesses the remarkable capacity of regeneration. It originates from myogenic precursor cells that are transformed into functional myofibers during embryogenesis by a temporally and spatially elaborated regulatory program. Considerable progress has been made in delineating myogenic pathways underlying muscle development. Gene regulatory networks orchestrated by myogenic transcription factors that integrate intrinsic and extrinsic inputs to trigger myogenesis in the embryo have been extensively characterized during the past decades. However, post-transcriptional regulation of myogenic differentiation, such as mRNA processing, stability and translation, has been less documented in skeletal muscle biology. Thus, the identification and functional assessment of major components involved in this regulatory paradigm, including but not limited to RNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, are key to understand the mechanism underlying myogenic lineage differentiation during embryonic development.


Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is also critically required for maintaining tissue homeostasis and plasticity. The regeneration of adult muscle is generally thought to recapitulate embryonic muscle development. Most of our knowledge on the activation, proliferation and differentiation of adult muscle stem cells to form new muscle fibers after muscle injury comes from studies in the embryo. It is intriguing to investigate how the post-transcriptional mechanism regulating embryonic myogenesis functions to modulate myogenic differentiation of satellite cells and other “non-muscle” stem cells. This should enhance our understanding of the muscle repair process and present significant implications in regenerative medicine.


In addition, it would be also of interest to evaluate whether the mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation diverges between trunk and head muscles, as demonstrated for their transcriptional regulation. This could help to elucidate the molecular basis underlying their distinct functional and evolutionary features.


This Research Topic aims to highlight recent advances on the role of post-transcriptional regulation in myogenic differentiation and skeletal muscle regeneration. Additionally, we welcome articles on the differentiation and regeneration of cardiac muscle. The development of genetic tools and new methods related to the study of myogenesis in different animal models is also appreciated. Contributors are encouraged to submit Mini-Reviews, Reviews, Commentaries, Perspectives, and Original Research articles. 



Keywords: Post-Transcriptional Regulation, Embryonic and Adult Myogenesis, Skeletal Muscle Biology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Skeletal muscle is the most abundant adult tissue in vertebrates and possesses the remarkable capacity of regeneration. It originates from myogenic precursor cells that are transformed into functional myofibers during embryogenesis by a temporally and spatially elaborated regulatory program. Considerable progress has been made in delineating myogenic pathways underlying muscle development. Gene regulatory networks orchestrated by myogenic transcription factors that integrate intrinsic and extrinsic inputs to trigger myogenesis in the embryo have been extensively characterized during the past decades. However, post-transcriptional regulation of myogenic differentiation, such as mRNA processing, stability and translation, has been less documented in skeletal muscle biology. Thus, the identification and functional assessment of major components involved in this regulatory paradigm, including but not limited to RNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, are key to understand the mechanism underlying myogenic lineage differentiation during embryonic development.


Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is also critically required for maintaining tissue homeostasis and plasticity. The regeneration of adult muscle is generally thought to recapitulate embryonic muscle development. Most of our knowledge on the activation, proliferation and differentiation of adult muscle stem cells to form new muscle fibers after muscle injury comes from studies in the embryo. It is intriguing to investigate how the post-transcriptional mechanism regulating embryonic myogenesis functions to modulate myogenic differentiation of satellite cells and other “non-muscle” stem cells. This should enhance our understanding of the muscle repair process and present significant implications in regenerative medicine.


In addition, it would be also of interest to evaluate whether the mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation diverges between trunk and head muscles, as demonstrated for their transcriptional regulation. This could help to elucidate the molecular basis underlying their distinct functional and evolutionary features.


This Research Topic aims to highlight recent advances on the role of post-transcriptional regulation in myogenic differentiation and skeletal muscle regeneration. Additionally, we welcome articles on the differentiation and regeneration of cardiac muscle. The development of genetic tools and new methods related to the study of myogenesis in different animal models is also appreciated. Contributors are encouraged to submit Mini-Reviews, Reviews, Commentaries, Perspectives, and Original Research articles. 



Keywords: Post-Transcriptional Regulation, Embryonic and Adult Myogenesis, Skeletal Muscle Biology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 July 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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