Research Topic

Dynamic Kinetochore

About this Research Topic

The kinetochore is a dynamic proteinaceous structure that forms on centromeric chromatin, which is in turn epigenetically labelled with histone H3 variant, CENP-A. The kinetochore connects the spindle microtubules to chromosomes to ensure the equal segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. When all the chromosomes are aligned, signals are released to inhibit the spindle assembly checkpoint, and the chromosomes are separated into two new daughter cells. The faithful segregation of chromosomes during cell division is essential, since an abnormal chromosome number in daughter cells is linked to cell death, congenital diseases (if cells are going through meiosis), or cancer.

The structure of kinetochore and the underlining centromere is intricate, consisting of several protein complexes. While centromere location is marked on the chromosome throughout the lifetime of the cell, the kinetochore complex forms during mitosis. The protein organization within both centromere and kinetochore is dynamically changing in time and space through a complex set of tightly regulated events during the cell cycle. Recent advances in biophysical, biochemical and genetic tools promise to deliver a more complete picture of dynamic processes in centromeres and kinetochores. Furthermore, there are notable differences in the organization and regulation of centromeres and kinetochores across different species.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover novel research and to give perspectives on current research developments, ultimately leading to a more complete understanding of centromere and kinetochore structure and regulation, the organization of centromeric chromatin and kinetochores in different species, at different stages of the cell cycle and in different physiological and pathological contexts.
We seek contributions from investigators addressing these questions across diverse fields including, but not limited to:
- Theoretical and computational approaches and models
- Biochemical, biophysical and analytical approaches
- Molecular and cellular biology approaches
- Genetic/genomic/proteomic/..omic approaches and screens
- Studies in cell cultures (cancer cells, primary cells…) or whole organisms


Keywords: Kinetochore, Microtubules, Centromere, Pericentromere, Centromeric Chromatin, Mitosis, Meiosis, Mitotic Spindle, Centromeric Transcription, Aneuploidy, Chromosome Mis-Segregation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The kinetochore is a dynamic proteinaceous structure that forms on centromeric chromatin, which is in turn epigenetically labelled with histone H3 variant, CENP-A. The kinetochore connects the spindle microtubules to chromosomes to ensure the equal segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. When all the chromosomes are aligned, signals are released to inhibit the spindle assembly checkpoint, and the chromosomes are separated into two new daughter cells. The faithful segregation of chromosomes during cell division is essential, since an abnormal chromosome number in daughter cells is linked to cell death, congenital diseases (if cells are going through meiosis), or cancer.

The structure of kinetochore and the underlining centromere is intricate, consisting of several protein complexes. While centromere location is marked on the chromosome throughout the lifetime of the cell, the kinetochore complex forms during mitosis. The protein organization within both centromere and kinetochore is dynamically changing in time and space through a complex set of tightly regulated events during the cell cycle. Recent advances in biophysical, biochemical and genetic tools promise to deliver a more complete picture of dynamic processes in centromeres and kinetochores. Furthermore, there are notable differences in the organization and regulation of centromeres and kinetochores across different species.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover novel research and to give perspectives on current research developments, ultimately leading to a more complete understanding of centromere and kinetochore structure and regulation, the organization of centromeric chromatin and kinetochores in different species, at different stages of the cell cycle and in different physiological and pathological contexts.
We seek contributions from investigators addressing these questions across diverse fields including, but not limited to:
- Theoretical and computational approaches and models
- Biochemical, biophysical and analytical approaches
- Molecular and cellular biology approaches
- Genetic/genomic/proteomic/..omic approaches and screens
- Studies in cell cultures (cancer cells, primary cells…) or whole organisms


Keywords: Kinetochore, Microtubules, Centromere, Pericentromere, Centromeric Chromatin, Mitosis, Meiosis, Mitotic Spindle, Centromeric Transcription, Aneuploidy, Chromosome Mis-Segregation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 August 2021 Abstract
31 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 August 2021 Abstract
31 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..