Research Topic

O-GlcNAcylation and the Immune System

About this Research Topic

The immune system distinguishes between autoantigens and foreign antigens, and fights against infectious and non-infectious foreign antigens by eliciting humoral and cellular responses. Immune dysfunction results in the development of autoimmune, inflammatory, or allergic diseases as well as malignancies of both immune and non-immune cells. Maintenance of immune homeostasis is an intricate biological process involving multiple pathways and molecular mechanisms.

One such mechanism is a type of glycosylation, where a monosaccharide, N-acetylglucosamine, is post-translationally added onto serine or threonine residues of nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins in a process called O-GlcNAcylation. It is mediated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) that adds and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) that removes the sugar from the target protein. O-GlcNAcylation plays a key role in regulating cell signaling, transcription, and translation, nutrient sensing, metabolism, development, normal physiology, and pathology.

Altered O-GlcNAcylation of cellular proteins has been implicated in many diseases and is also associated with metabolic dysfunction. Recent studies have shed light into the role of O-GlcNAcylation in T cell development and functions, Treg cell function, B cell function and antibody production, macrophage function, as well as in immune cell survival and malignancies. How O-GlcNAcylation regulates the immune system in health and diseases is an emerging area of research and the knowledge on the precise role(s) of O-GlcNAcylated proteins in the immune cells and immune responses is limited.

In this Research Topic, we welcome the submission of Original Research, Review, Mini-Review, and Method articles that feature recent advances in our understanding of how
O-GlcNAcylation of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins regulate immune system development as well as its function and dysfunction. The aim of this Research Topic is to gather a collection of articles that address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

O-GlcNAcylation and Immune system development- Generation, survival, and proliferation of immune cells in the primary and secondary lymphoid organs

O-GlcNAcylation and Innate Immunity- non-specific immune response, recognition of pathogens and danger signals, complement cascades, neutrophils, macrophages, antigen presentation by innate immune cells, phagocytosis, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells

O-GlcNAcylation and Adaptive Immunity- cellular immunity, humoral immunity, antigen presentation by adaptive immune cells, regulatory cells and immunosuppression, immunological memory

O-GlcNAcylation and Immunometabolism- nutrient regulation of the immune system, biochemical pathways and energetics, the role of cellular stress

O-GlcNAcylation and Immune diseases- immune deficiency diseases, autoimmunity, inflammatory diseases

O-GlcNAcylation and Cancer immunology- hematopoietic malignancies, inflammation-induced cancer, cancer-associated inflammation, implications in immunotherapy

O-GlcNAcylation, Omics, drugs and technology development relevant to the immune system- Chemical biology and glycobiology approaches to develop drugs and inhibitors targeting O-GlcNAcylation in the immune system, genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics, novel technology to detect and quantify O-GlcNAcylation in the immune system.


Topic Editor Dr. Hart receives a share of royalty received on sales of the CTD 110.6 antibody, managed by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The other Topic Editor declares no conflict of interest with regards to the Research Topic.


Keywords: O-GlcNAcylation, Post-translational modification, immune system, autoimmunity, inflammation, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, immune diseases, cytokines


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The immune system distinguishes between autoantigens and foreign antigens, and fights against infectious and non-infectious foreign antigens by eliciting humoral and cellular responses. Immune dysfunction results in the development of autoimmune, inflammatory, or allergic diseases as well as malignancies of both immune and non-immune cells. Maintenance of immune homeostasis is an intricate biological process involving multiple pathways and molecular mechanisms.

One such mechanism is a type of glycosylation, where a monosaccharide, N-acetylglucosamine, is post-translationally added onto serine or threonine residues of nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins in a process called O-GlcNAcylation. It is mediated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) that adds and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) that removes the sugar from the target protein. O-GlcNAcylation plays a key role in regulating cell signaling, transcription, and translation, nutrient sensing, metabolism, development, normal physiology, and pathology.

Altered O-GlcNAcylation of cellular proteins has been implicated in many diseases and is also associated with metabolic dysfunction. Recent studies have shed light into the role of O-GlcNAcylation in T cell development and functions, Treg cell function, B cell function and antibody production, macrophage function, as well as in immune cell survival and malignancies. How O-GlcNAcylation regulates the immune system in health and diseases is an emerging area of research and the knowledge on the precise role(s) of O-GlcNAcylated proteins in the immune cells and immune responses is limited.

In this Research Topic, we welcome the submission of Original Research, Review, Mini-Review, and Method articles that feature recent advances in our understanding of how
O-GlcNAcylation of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins regulate immune system development as well as its function and dysfunction. The aim of this Research Topic is to gather a collection of articles that address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

O-GlcNAcylation and Immune system development- Generation, survival, and proliferation of immune cells in the primary and secondary lymphoid organs

O-GlcNAcylation and Innate Immunity- non-specific immune response, recognition of pathogens and danger signals, complement cascades, neutrophils, macrophages, antigen presentation by innate immune cells, phagocytosis, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells

O-GlcNAcylation and Adaptive Immunity- cellular immunity, humoral immunity, antigen presentation by adaptive immune cells, regulatory cells and immunosuppression, immunological memory

O-GlcNAcylation and Immunometabolism- nutrient regulation of the immune system, biochemical pathways and energetics, the role of cellular stress

O-GlcNAcylation and Immune diseases- immune deficiency diseases, autoimmunity, inflammatory diseases

O-GlcNAcylation and Cancer immunology- hematopoietic malignancies, inflammation-induced cancer, cancer-associated inflammation, implications in immunotherapy

O-GlcNAcylation, Omics, drugs and technology development relevant to the immune system- Chemical biology and glycobiology approaches to develop drugs and inhibitors targeting O-GlcNAcylation in the immune system, genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics, novel technology to detect and quantify O-GlcNAcylation in the immune system.


Topic Editor Dr. Hart receives a share of royalty received on sales of the CTD 110.6 antibody, managed by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The other Topic Editor declares no conflict of interest with regards to the Research Topic.


Keywords: O-GlcNAcylation, Post-translational modification, immune system, autoimmunity, inflammation, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, immune diseases, cytokines


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
29 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2021 Abstract
29 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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