About this Research Topic

Submission closed.

Research on the expression of motion across languages has proved fruitful in exploring the relation between cognition and language. The typological differences in the encoding of semantic components of motion in different languages have shed light on how these components affect the type of thought used in ...

Research on the expression of motion across languages has proved fruitful in exploring the relation between cognition and language. The typological differences in the encoding of semantic components of motion in different languages have shed light on how these components affect the type of thought used in online communication (i.e. thinking for speaking), with implications for rhetorical style, attention focus and memory. Recent decades have seen an ongoing debate on the malleability of thinking for speaking patterns in the acquisition of a second language. Previous studies have shown a variety of results depending on factors such as the language pair, the proficiency level, and the type of instruction.

This Research Topic aims to contribute to our understanding of how motion events are acquired in the second/multiple language learning process. The in-depth study of specific components and subcomponents of motion, such as Cause and Deixis (beyond the more heavily researched contrast between Manner and Path), may allow us to make significant progress in this area. Furthermore, new approaches such as the multilingual turn in second language acquisition, which compares different types of multilingual speakers, or the use of innovative techniques such as eye-tracking can shed new light on the debate. Finally, by focusing on target languages other than English, this Research Topic will also contribute to a better understanding of how motion events are acquired across less-researched languages. In this way, we aim to promote studies on motion events that may identify overlooked areas and thereby cross boundaries into unexplored territories.

We welcome contributions that explore the acquisition of motion events in additional languages (L2, L3, LX…) with different types of bilingual or multilingual speakers (early, late, heritage bi-/multilinguals), particularly in less commonly researched language pairs in this typology, including minority languages. Studies focusing on understudied areas of motion are particularly welcome (including specific semantic restrictions, the acquisition of particularly challenging aspects of motion, in-depth study of particular semantic components, gesture and SLA). We welcome submissions employing a wide range of innovative methodologies, including psycholinguistic, longitudinal and cross-sectional acquisition studies, as well as innovative pedagogical interventions.

Keywords: Cognitive linguistics, Semantic typology, Motion events, Second Language Acquisition, Cross-linguistic influence


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

Recent Articles

Loading..

articles

Sort by:

Loading..

authors

Loading..

views

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.