Research Topic

Reproducibility in Computational Studies of Muscle, Joint and Tissue Loads in the Musculoskeletal System

About this Research Topic

Knowledge of muscle, soft-tissue, and joint loads, which may include quantifying the load-sharing between these structures, is important in multiple fields including sports, ergonomics and orthopedics. Invasive and/or indirect measurement of these loads is often difficult, if not impossible. Computational approaches such as musculoskeletal, rigid-body and/or finite element analysis have emerged as the de facto approach to overcome this difficulty.

Establishing both the validity and reproducibility of computational studies is critical if they are to mature to the level of translation. Initiatives such as the Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In Vivo Knee Loads and the “KneeHub” project have directly addressed the validity and reproducibility potential of related simulations. Findings from both projects have demonstrated the loads predicted by independent research teams can vary significantly despite identical experimental data inputs.

The goal of this Research Topic is to advance our understanding of the current state of the reproducibility of load estimates, using musculoskeletal, rigid-body, and/or finite element models. This will be accomplished by encouraging authors to contribute to the dialogue surrounding reproducibility in these computational approaches, which may include both scientific and philosophical efforts. We hope this effort will encourage the development of novel approaches to study and/or improve reproducibility while also supporting initiatives that foster standardization and best practices.

We welcome manuscripts for the forthcoming Research Topic on the reproducibility of computational prediction of loads in the musculoskeletal system. Topics included in this collection can range from novel theoretical approaches that address reproducibility challenges to new studies that assess the reproducibility of load estimation, establishing best practices, and standardization initiatives. Both Reviews and Original Research articles are welcome. Reviews should provide an up-to-date and critical overview of the state-of-the-art and/or theoretical methods to study reproducibility. Both Reviews and Original Research articles should address one or more of the following areas and have an emphasis on improving the reproducibility of load estimations:

• Theoretical approaches to study reproducibility
• Collect and synthesize the current knowledge of reproducibility of musculoskeletal load estimations and tissue stresses and strains.
• Novel studies on the reproducibility of musculoskeletal load estimations and tissue stresses and strains
• Standardization and best practice initiatives


Keywords: Soft-Tissue, Muscle, Joint Loads, Computational, Reproducibility


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Knowledge of muscle, soft-tissue, and joint loads, which may include quantifying the load-sharing between these structures, is important in multiple fields including sports, ergonomics and orthopedics. Invasive and/or indirect measurement of these loads is often difficult, if not impossible. Computational approaches such as musculoskeletal, rigid-body and/or finite element analysis have emerged as the de facto approach to overcome this difficulty.

Establishing both the validity and reproducibility of computational studies is critical if they are to mature to the level of translation. Initiatives such as the Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In Vivo Knee Loads and the “KneeHub” project have directly addressed the validity and reproducibility potential of related simulations. Findings from both projects have demonstrated the loads predicted by independent research teams can vary significantly despite identical experimental data inputs.

The goal of this Research Topic is to advance our understanding of the current state of the reproducibility of load estimates, using musculoskeletal, rigid-body, and/or finite element models. This will be accomplished by encouraging authors to contribute to the dialogue surrounding reproducibility in these computational approaches, which may include both scientific and philosophical efforts. We hope this effort will encourage the development of novel approaches to study and/or improve reproducibility while also supporting initiatives that foster standardization and best practices.

We welcome manuscripts for the forthcoming Research Topic on the reproducibility of computational prediction of loads in the musculoskeletal system. Topics included in this collection can range from novel theoretical approaches that address reproducibility challenges to new studies that assess the reproducibility of load estimation, establishing best practices, and standardization initiatives. Both Reviews and Original Research articles are welcome. Reviews should provide an up-to-date and critical overview of the state-of-the-art and/or theoretical methods to study reproducibility. Both Reviews and Original Research articles should address one or more of the following areas and have an emphasis on improving the reproducibility of load estimations:

• Theoretical approaches to study reproducibility
• Collect and synthesize the current knowledge of reproducibility of musculoskeletal load estimations and tissue stresses and strains.
• Novel studies on the reproducibility of musculoskeletal load estimations and tissue stresses and strains
• Standardization and best practice initiatives


Keywords: Soft-Tissue, Muscle, Joint Loads, Computational, Reproducibility


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

25 August 2021 Abstract
22 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

25 August 2021 Abstract
22 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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