Research Topic

Transport Demand Management in the Era of App-influenced Mobility

About this Research Topic

Online applications, especially smartphone and tablet applications (Apps), are revolutionising urban transport. Apps have enabled the creation of new transport services, such as ride-hailing and crowdsourced delivery services, facilitated the expansion of carsharing and shared micro-mobility, improved traveller experiences by increasing access to real-time information on transport options and traffic conditions, among other innovations.

Transport Demand Management (TDM) strategies aim to improve transport systems by using resources more efficiently. They may reward users who make choices that improve the performance of the system or penalise those that do the contrary. TDM strategies may also improve sustainable transport options (e.g., transit, or non-motorized modes) or reduce the need for physical travel through tele-activities.
Some Apps and App-based services have contributed directly to the development of TDM strategies, while others appear to have a double-edged sword effect on transport systems. An example of the latter is ride-hailing. While it can improve overall access to car travel and increase accessibility levels in medium density areas, ride-hailing may also compete with public transport in high density areas and contribute to road and curb congestion. Hence, management strategies may be required to tackle negative externalities brought by new Apps and App-based services.

The goal of this Research Topic is to bring together innovative studies that employ TDM strategies either based on capabilities engendered by Apps, or to address new transport challenges caused by Apps and App-based services, in order to ultimately improve transport systems. The Research Topic incorporates innovative studies based on current transport systems and for future systems (e.g., automated vehicle and unmanned aerial vehicle future).

We encourage submissions involving original research of multiple nature: simulation, optimisation, empirical modelling, exploratory and policy analysis, case studies with supporting empirical evidence, and reviews. Quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods approaches are welcome.

Of particular interest are papers addressing, but not limited to, the following aspects :
- Strategies for management of demand and operations of ride-hailing, shared micro-mobility, and crowdshipping, both in current and future automated scenarios.
- Gamification of transport choices (including token economy systems) and its impacts on traffic.
- Information and communication technology (ICT)-assisted TDM strategies.
- Impacts of real-time information on traveller choices and traffic.
- Use of crowdsourced information to enhance traveller experience (and its impacts on traffic).
- Transport demand and traffic impacts of telework, telehealth, e-learning, e-recreation, and virtual social gatherings.
- Impacts of Apps on accessibility: physical and digital accessibility.
- Mobility-as-a-service.
- COVID-19/pandemic transport demand management using Apps.
- Attracting and managing public transport demand in pandemic and post-pandemic scenarios using Apps.


Keywords: Transport Demand Management (TDM), Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), Smartphone Application, Travel behaviour, Gamification, Crowdsourcing, Ride-hailing, Automated vehicles


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Online applications, especially smartphone and tablet applications (Apps), are revolutionising urban transport. Apps have enabled the creation of new transport services, such as ride-hailing and crowdsourced delivery services, facilitated the expansion of carsharing and shared micro-mobility, improved traveller experiences by increasing access to real-time information on transport options and traffic conditions, among other innovations.

Transport Demand Management (TDM) strategies aim to improve transport systems by using resources more efficiently. They may reward users who make choices that improve the performance of the system or penalise those that do the contrary. TDM strategies may also improve sustainable transport options (e.g., transit, or non-motorized modes) or reduce the need for physical travel through tele-activities.
Some Apps and App-based services have contributed directly to the development of TDM strategies, while others appear to have a double-edged sword effect on transport systems. An example of the latter is ride-hailing. While it can improve overall access to car travel and increase accessibility levels in medium density areas, ride-hailing may also compete with public transport in high density areas and contribute to road and curb congestion. Hence, management strategies may be required to tackle negative externalities brought by new Apps and App-based services.

The goal of this Research Topic is to bring together innovative studies that employ TDM strategies either based on capabilities engendered by Apps, or to address new transport challenges caused by Apps and App-based services, in order to ultimately improve transport systems. The Research Topic incorporates innovative studies based on current transport systems and for future systems (e.g., automated vehicle and unmanned aerial vehicle future).

We encourage submissions involving original research of multiple nature: simulation, optimisation, empirical modelling, exploratory and policy analysis, case studies with supporting empirical evidence, and reviews. Quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods approaches are welcome.

Of particular interest are papers addressing, but not limited to, the following aspects :
- Strategies for management of demand and operations of ride-hailing, shared micro-mobility, and crowdshipping, both in current and future automated scenarios.
- Gamification of transport choices (including token economy systems) and its impacts on traffic.
- Information and communication technology (ICT)-assisted TDM strategies.
- Impacts of real-time information on traveller choices and traffic.
- Use of crowdsourced information to enhance traveller experience (and its impacts on traffic).
- Transport demand and traffic impacts of telework, telehealth, e-learning, e-recreation, and virtual social gatherings.
- Impacts of Apps on accessibility: physical and digital accessibility.
- Mobility-as-a-service.
- COVID-19/pandemic transport demand management using Apps.
- Attracting and managing public transport demand in pandemic and post-pandemic scenarios using Apps.


Keywords: Transport Demand Management (TDM), Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), Smartphone Application, Travel behaviour, Gamification, Crowdsourcing, Ride-hailing, Automated vehicles


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 August 2021 Abstract
28 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 August 2021 Abstract
28 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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