Research Topic

Medicinal Plants and Their Active Constituents in the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

About this Research Topic

Metabolic Syndrome (MeSy) is a complex group of metabolic disorder syndromes. The MeSy was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, which was updated by the American Heart Association. It is a public sub-health problem that has emerged as a worldwide health concern and a major challenge, gradually. An estimated 20%–30% of adults of the world have MeSy. MeSy is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. People affected by MeSy could be managed by either pharmacologic interventions or supplementary treatments. Medicinal plants are claimed to prevent MS, improve health, and increase life expectancy, in addition, to support the structure and function of the body. Researchers have discovered many medicinal plants as well as their active constituents (polyphenolics, alkaloids, terpenes, etc.) that are suggested to alleviate MeSy and its complications via different mechanisms. Although achievements have been made in this field in recent years, knowledge on the development and progression of MeSy is still incomplete. The molecular pathogenesis of MeSy is not well known.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather new and creative studies that covers the subject as thoroughly as possible and provide useful directions for managing or solving complications of MeSy using medicinal plants and their active constituents. We hope that this Research Topic will enhance the knowledge on the development and progression of MeSy and provide further insights into the understanding of the pathogenesis of MeSy, which may give a reliable basis for new strategies in preventing and treating conditions associated with MeSy. Hopefully, the Research Topic will add to the existing understanding, as well as generate interest in further studies in this area that may be useful for medical application.

We encourage researchers to submit their contributions to the activity of medicinal plants and their active constituents that could help manage and treat MeSy and its complications. Food interventions as such may not be considered due to the low bioavailability (dietary food components in vitro effects are often of limited or no therapeutic relevance), but only interventions that have a pharmacological basis.

We welcome the following subtopics, but not limited to:
● Medicinal plants and their active constituents in the management of insulin resistance.
● Structure-activity relationship of active constituents in the treatment of MeSy.
● Active constituents in management of obesity and hypertension.
● Pharmaceutical formulation in MeSy-related cardiovascular diseases.
● Management of MeSy and diabetes by different pharmacologically active constituents.
● Medicinal plants in management of diabetes and diabetic complications.
● Links between local/traditional uses and biomedical assessments of herbal medicines.
● Impact of MeSy on the bioavailability of active constituents.

The treatment of symptoms of MeSy as defined by local/traditional practices should normally form the basis for pharmacological investigations and a potential focus might be on anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, or antioxidant activity. Clearly, there is no direct link between local/traditional uses and the biomedical investigation on MT, and therefore, we encourage an assessment of how local and traditional interventions may form a basis for selecting species for research on MT.

With this Research Topic, we are aiming at a global perspective, with contributions from all continents and traditional medicine systems such as Chinese Medicine, Kampo, Ayurvedic, South Africa or the Americas. MeSy network pharmacological studies must be conducted in combination with a hypothesis-based assessment using established experimental pharmacological models.

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All the manuscripts submitted to the collection will need to fully comply with the Four Pillars of Best Practice in Ethnopharmacology (you can freely download the full version here).

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Keywords: Medicinal plants, Metabolism syndrome, Bioavailability, Obesity, Hypertension


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Metabolic Syndrome (MeSy) is a complex group of metabolic disorder syndromes. The MeSy was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, which was updated by the American Heart Association. It is a public sub-health problem that has emerged as a worldwide health concern and a major challenge, gradually. An estimated 20%–30% of adults of the world have MeSy. MeSy is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. People affected by MeSy could be managed by either pharmacologic interventions or supplementary treatments. Medicinal plants are claimed to prevent MS, improve health, and increase life expectancy, in addition, to support the structure and function of the body. Researchers have discovered many medicinal plants as well as their active constituents (polyphenolics, alkaloids, terpenes, etc.) that are suggested to alleviate MeSy and its complications via different mechanisms. Although achievements have been made in this field in recent years, knowledge on the development and progression of MeSy is still incomplete. The molecular pathogenesis of MeSy is not well known.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather new and creative studies that covers the subject as thoroughly as possible and provide useful directions for managing or solving complications of MeSy using medicinal plants and their active constituents. We hope that this Research Topic will enhance the knowledge on the development and progression of MeSy and provide further insights into the understanding of the pathogenesis of MeSy, which may give a reliable basis for new strategies in preventing and treating conditions associated with MeSy. Hopefully, the Research Topic will add to the existing understanding, as well as generate interest in further studies in this area that may be useful for medical application.

We encourage researchers to submit their contributions to the activity of medicinal plants and their active constituents that could help manage and treat MeSy and its complications. Food interventions as such may not be considered due to the low bioavailability (dietary food components in vitro effects are often of limited or no therapeutic relevance), but only interventions that have a pharmacological basis.

We welcome the following subtopics, but not limited to:
● Medicinal plants and their active constituents in the management of insulin resistance.
● Structure-activity relationship of active constituents in the treatment of MeSy.
● Active constituents in management of obesity and hypertension.
● Pharmaceutical formulation in MeSy-related cardiovascular diseases.
● Management of MeSy and diabetes by different pharmacologically active constituents.
● Medicinal plants in management of diabetes and diabetic complications.
● Links between local/traditional uses and biomedical assessments of herbal medicines.
● Impact of MeSy on the bioavailability of active constituents.

The treatment of symptoms of MeSy as defined by local/traditional practices should normally form the basis for pharmacological investigations and a potential focus might be on anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, or antioxidant activity. Clearly, there is no direct link between local/traditional uses and the biomedical investigation on MT, and therefore, we encourage an assessment of how local and traditional interventions may form a basis for selecting species for research on MT.

With this Research Topic, we are aiming at a global perspective, with contributions from all continents and traditional medicine systems such as Chinese Medicine, Kampo, Ayurvedic, South Africa or the Americas. MeSy network pharmacological studies must be conducted in combination with a hypothesis-based assessment using established experimental pharmacological models.

---

All the manuscripts submitted to the collection will need to fully comply with the Four Pillars of Best Practice in Ethnopharmacology (you can freely download the full version here).

---


Keywords: Medicinal plants, Metabolism syndrome, Bioavailability, Obesity, Hypertension


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 October 2021 Abstract
01 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 October 2021 Abstract
01 February 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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