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Alcohol and drug use contribute substantially to the global burden of disease and injury, and worldwide mortality. The global action plan for the prevention and control of non-communicable disease (NCDs) envisages 10% relative reduction in the harmful use of alcohol by 2025; the sustainable development goal ...

Alcohol and drug use contribute substantially to the global burden of disease and injury, and worldwide mortality. The global action plan for the prevention and control of non-communicable disease (NCDs) envisages 10% relative reduction in the harmful use of alcohol by 2025; the sustainable development goal has envisioned prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including harmful use of alcohol and narcotics. Although commitment and national level cooperation are very encouraging, we require a definite roadmap to realize the future goals. Screening and brief interventions (SBI) are high impact strategy that can contribute significantly to the prevention or minimization of harms related to alcohol and drug use.

Despite the evidence of effectiveness in clinical trials across various settings of healthcare and at community level, the integration and adoption of SBI in routine care is sub-optimal. Researchers have identified potential structural, systemic, and attitudinal barriers for this evidence-practice gap of SBI. Various innovations, such as electronic SBI, have been conceived to improve the feasibility and acceptability of BI and to overcome the implementation barriers. Notwithstanding the existing evidence of effectiveness of SBI, there is limited consensus on its role in illicit drug misuse and in special populations (e.g., adolescents, women, prisoners). The optimal number and duration of sessions, and duration of effect are other important questions that remain unanswered.

This issue will be specially dedicated to (a) (b) research on the potential reasons of evidence-practice gap, and (c) studies on innovative solutions to overcome the barriers of integration and implementation of brief intervention in routine practice. We expect this issue on SBI to have impact on the international policy development and practice.

• Exploring the evidence gap in the efficacy and effectiveness of brief interventions in substance misuse;
• Research to enable policy makers and practitioners to examine the findings and quality of existing evidence and aid informed judgment and evidence-based decision making
• Perspectives and reviews to give directions to the future research
• Research on the potential reasons of evidence-practice gap
• Studies on innovative solutions to overcome the barriers of integration and implementation of brief intervention in routine practice.

We will accept a wide range of articles in this research topic (such as original research, brief research reports, clinical trials, systematic reviews, mini reviews, technology reports, hypotheses & theory, perspectives, and community case studies).

Keywords: Screening, Brief Interventions, Substance Misuse, Substance Use, Prevention, Policy, Evidence Gap


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