Research Topic

Spatial Aspects of Urban Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology

About this Research Topic

Fragmented landscapes have often been thought of as barriers to the overall health of animal populations and animal species richness. Traditionally, scientists have examined the role of fragmented landscapes and land classification as a predictor of habitat quality and animal species richness. Urban landscapes by definition are fragmented, and how animals respond to fragmentation in urban areas will help inform urban environment planning and policy. With the push to create more urban green spaces and green corridors, urban landscapes have become more ecologically diverse and serve as reservoirs for some animal species.

The goal of this Research Topic is to investigate how spatial ecology is applied to urban landscapes as a new avenue of conservation biology. To achieve this, we wish to examine how animals in a ‘natural’ environment differ from animals in and an urban environment: How much do the animals differ with resource use, range area, etc.?; Do they use the same kinds of spaces?; How do landscape ecology metrics differ in the two spaces (natural vs urban)?; Can we make urban environments suitable to species and do their behaviors differ in one place or another?; How do urban greenspaces change the way that animals act?; Can geospatial technologies (e.g., Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing) help us to better understand urban spatial ecology and its impact on animal species?

We encourage studies that examine the changing dynamics of animal species and their environment in urban settings, including but not limited to:
• Animal responses to urban landscapes
• Greenspaces and animal movement
• Animal population growth in urban areas
• Urban animal habitat
• Natural vs. urban settings
• Urban forest policy
• Urban vegetation cover
• Urban greenspaces and urban greenspace management


Keywords: spatial ecology, urban ecology, conservation biology, human environment interactions, landscape ecology, Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Fragmented landscapes have often been thought of as barriers to the overall health of animal populations and animal species richness. Traditionally, scientists have examined the role of fragmented landscapes and land classification as a predictor of habitat quality and animal species richness. Urban landscapes by definition are fragmented, and how animals respond to fragmentation in urban areas will help inform urban environment planning and policy. With the push to create more urban green spaces and green corridors, urban landscapes have become more ecologically diverse and serve as reservoirs for some animal species.

The goal of this Research Topic is to investigate how spatial ecology is applied to urban landscapes as a new avenue of conservation biology. To achieve this, we wish to examine how animals in a ‘natural’ environment differ from animals in and an urban environment: How much do the animals differ with resource use, range area, etc.?; Do they use the same kinds of spaces?; How do landscape ecology metrics differ in the two spaces (natural vs urban)?; Can we make urban environments suitable to species and do their behaviors differ in one place or another?; How do urban greenspaces change the way that animals act?; Can geospatial technologies (e.g., Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing) help us to better understand urban spatial ecology and its impact on animal species?

We encourage studies that examine the changing dynamics of animal species and their environment in urban settings, including but not limited to:
• Animal responses to urban landscapes
• Greenspaces and animal movement
• Animal population growth in urban areas
• Urban animal habitat
• Natural vs. urban settings
• Urban forest policy
• Urban vegetation cover
• Urban greenspaces and urban greenspace management


Keywords: spatial ecology, urban ecology, conservation biology, human environment interactions, landscape ecology, Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
30 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
30 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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