Research Topic

The impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic on the family, education, development and wellbeing of children with SEND

About this Research Topic

Children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and their families have been significantly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. The impact of the pandemic and successive lockdowns on this population has been reported in various countries, with direct and indirect consequences. Direct impact is a public health concern, as children with SEND are often more susceptible to moderate to severe disease, although severe disease is rare in children (e.g. Ladhani et al., 2020). However, indirect effects are relevant to all children with SEND, who reportedly missed out on essential services during the various lockdowns (e.g. Crawley et al., 2020). Their parents have also been affected to a substantial extent, as often respite care was lost with consequences for their mental health and wellbeing (e.g. Asbury, Fox, Deniz, Code and Toseeb, 2020; Chen, Chen, Li & Ren, 2020).
Although these impacts are well documented, the extent of the long-term effects of the pandemic on children with SEND and their families is still to be fully appreciated. For example, little evidence is available on children's own perspectives of the pandemic. Similarly, more knowledge is needed on the extent of the effects of the pandemic in the Global South, where already stretched and underfunded services were hindered even further. In this special issue, we invite original papers that provide new evidence, insights and advancements regarding the impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic on family dynamics, education and learning, as well as on development and wellbeing of children with SEND. We particularly welcome original research that showcases children's own perspectives, research from the Global South (although research from any country will be welcome) and research that addresses children's wellbeing from an interdisciplinary perspective.
We welcome original research papers describing impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities, including on their wellbeing education, family and community. We particularly welcome interdisciplinary research that looks at impacts on all or many of these life domains. We hope to see contributors from across the Globe, including from the Global South.


Keywords: Covid-19, SEND, education, wellbeing, mental health


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and their families have been significantly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. The impact of the pandemic and successive lockdowns on this population has been reported in various countries, with direct and indirect consequences. Direct impact is a public health concern, as children with SEND are often more susceptible to moderate to severe disease, although severe disease is rare in children (e.g. Ladhani et al., 2020). However, indirect effects are relevant to all children with SEND, who reportedly missed out on essential services during the various lockdowns (e.g. Crawley et al., 2020). Their parents have also been affected to a substantial extent, as often respite care was lost with consequences for their mental health and wellbeing (e.g. Asbury, Fox, Deniz, Code and Toseeb, 2020; Chen, Chen, Li & Ren, 2020).
Although these impacts are well documented, the extent of the long-term effects of the pandemic on children with SEND and their families is still to be fully appreciated. For example, little evidence is available on children's own perspectives of the pandemic. Similarly, more knowledge is needed on the extent of the effects of the pandemic in the Global South, where already stretched and underfunded services were hindered even further. In this special issue, we invite original papers that provide new evidence, insights and advancements regarding the impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic on family dynamics, education and learning, as well as on development and wellbeing of children with SEND. We particularly welcome original research that showcases children's own perspectives, research from the Global South (although research from any country will be welcome) and research that addresses children's wellbeing from an interdisciplinary perspective.
We welcome original research papers describing impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities, including on their wellbeing education, family and community. We particularly welcome interdisciplinary research that looks at impacts on all or many of these life domains. We hope to see contributors from across the Globe, including from the Global South.


Keywords: Covid-19, SEND, education, wellbeing, mental health


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

18 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

18 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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