Research Topic

Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Pathogens: ecology, epidemiology, and mechanisms

About this Research Topic

Antimicrobial resistance has become a global health concern. It has been predicted that antimicrobial-resistant pathogens will cause 10 million deaths worldwide by the year 2050. In recent decades, the prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria is rapidly increasing due to the long-term and misuse of antimicrobials in human and veterinary medicine. The majority of antimicrobials are used in food-producing animals, MDR even extensively drug-resistant bacteria have been frequently reported in animals, particularly plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance genes mcr and plasmid-mediated tigecycline resistance genes tet(X). Antimicrobial resistance could be transfer from animals to humans via the food chain, close contact, or the environment

Food is an important source for human infections. For example, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important foodborne pathogens, present in various food products, could cause salmonellosis and listeriosis. Foodborne pathogens have caused outbreaks in many countries associated with food contamination. The rising trends of multidrug resistance in foodborne pathogens are alarming. One the one hand, MDR foodborne bacteria could infect human worldwide, and clinical treatment of antimicrobials will be compromised. One the other hand, antimicrobial resistance could be easily transmitted to humans through the food chain. As antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens represents a biological hazard, it is important to better understand the ecology, epidemiology and transmission mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance among foodborne pathogens.

This Research Topic will focus on antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens (e.g., Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria). Emergence and dissemination of resistance genes in foodborne pathogens via the food chain will be of particular interest for this topic. Articles can be original research or reviews. Themes in the Research Topic include but not limited to:
• Regional or long-term Resistance surveillance of foodborne pathogens.
• Globally or regionally spread of multidrug resistant epidemic foodborne pathogens clones
• The horizontal spread of resistance genes among foodborne pathogens
• Dissemination of resistance genes in foodborne pathogens


Keywords: antimicrobial resistance, foodborne pathogens, transmission, food chain, resistance genes, epidemic clone


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Antimicrobial resistance has become a global health concern. It has been predicted that antimicrobial-resistant pathogens will cause 10 million deaths worldwide by the year 2050. In recent decades, the prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria is rapidly increasing due to the long-term and misuse of antimicrobials in human and veterinary medicine. The majority of antimicrobials are used in food-producing animals, MDR even extensively drug-resistant bacteria have been frequently reported in animals, particularly plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance genes mcr and plasmid-mediated tigecycline resistance genes tet(X). Antimicrobial resistance could be transfer from animals to humans via the food chain, close contact, or the environment

Food is an important source for human infections. For example, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important foodborne pathogens, present in various food products, could cause salmonellosis and listeriosis. Foodborne pathogens have caused outbreaks in many countries associated with food contamination. The rising trends of multidrug resistance in foodborne pathogens are alarming. One the one hand, MDR foodborne bacteria could infect human worldwide, and clinical treatment of antimicrobials will be compromised. One the other hand, antimicrobial resistance could be easily transmitted to humans through the food chain. As antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens represents a biological hazard, it is important to better understand the ecology, epidemiology and transmission mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance among foodborne pathogens.

This Research Topic will focus on antimicrobial resistance in foodborne pathogens (e.g., Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria). Emergence and dissemination of resistance genes in foodborne pathogens via the food chain will be of particular interest for this topic. Articles can be original research or reviews. Themes in the Research Topic include but not limited to:
• Regional or long-term Resistance surveillance of foodborne pathogens.
• Globally or regionally spread of multidrug resistant epidemic foodborne pathogens clones
• The horizontal spread of resistance genes among foodborne pathogens
• Dissemination of resistance genes in foodborne pathogens


Keywords: antimicrobial resistance, foodborne pathogens, transmission, food chain, resistance genes, epidemic clone


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
31 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
31 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..