Research Topic

Sound, Music and Movement in Parkinson’s disease

About this Research Topic

Recent years brought new insights to the understanding of Parkinson's disease and the potential of use of sound displays or music in rehabilitation and movement facilitation. With the growth of modern technology and the increasing portability of hi-specification devices (such as smart phones) new approaches ...

Recent years brought new insights to the understanding of Parkinson's disease and the potential of use of sound displays or music in rehabilitation and movement facilitation. With the growth of modern technology and the increasing portability of hi-specification devices (such as smart phones) new approaches are currently being explored. In this Research Topic we want to bring together top scientists from the movement disorders, motor control and sound-related studies along with therapists to engage in scientific dialogue.

What sound displays have the best application for Parkinson's disease patients? How much do sound-based interventions improve global motor function? How should auditory guides be displayed in terms of space properties (headphones, stereo display)? In addition, we want to encourage discourse addressing the topic of how much Parkinson's disease neurodegeneration influences perception of temporal structures, auditory signals and rhythmical structures. What are the frontiers for using a sound and music display rehabilitation approach in Parkinson's disease?

Many research groups have explored the use of auditory cues (such as rhythmical auditory training) in improving gait and upper limb movement parameters. Cues are usually either intermittent (metronome) or continuous (dynamic sound displays). Group dance based interventions suggests that patients benefit from additional sensory information (from temporal structure embedded in music and proprioceptive information from a dancing partner) that facilities movement. There is growing evidence that auditory signals in the environment can provide a temporal template for movement and change the mode of motor control from intrinsic to extrinsic; habitual to goal-directed, enabling enhanced motor performance in patients. In addition, forced exercise rate studies show that exercising at the pace of healthy adults can have potential neuroprotective benefits for patients. On the contrary, studies dedicated to auditory perception and motor timing report an impaired ability of patients to perceive and synchronise with complex rhythmical structures (i.e. causing an inability to play musical instruments).

This Research Topic of Frontiers will provide a forum for leading researchers in the field of Parkinson's disease investigations and sound studies to present original research papers, integrative reviews or theoretical articles that further our understanding of the potential of auditory displays in movement facilitation and rehabilitation. Articles can address a wide range of issues including, (but not limited to), rhythmical auditory training, cueing, sonification, dance and movement therapy, as well as auditory perception and timing. Articles are welcome from the field of neurology, neuroscience, motor control, experimental psychology, neuroimaging, neurophysiology, dance studies and music research. The goal of this Research Topic is to explore a state-of-the-art view of the field and engage in cross-disciplinary and challenging scientific debate about future rehabilitation avenues and frontiers for Parkinson's disease patients.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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