About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 22 August 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 21 October 2022

Solid organ transplantation has evolved a lot in the last few decades. In children, these advances are even more surprising. Limits have been crossed in children with complex pathologies, very low weight, tumors with uncertain prognoses, etc. that a few decades ago would not have been considered transplant candidates. After transplant, the use of cellular therapies, or the withdrawal of immunosuppression after developing immunological complications, are scenarios that occur in selected cases and that have made us learn in the field. This is common for all solid organs, such as transplantation of the liver, kidney, intestine, heart, or lung.

There is much less scientific evidence on all these advances in pediatrics and pediatric transplantation always lags somewhat behind adult transplants due to the lower number of cases. However, the plasticity of the child to achieve immunological tolerance, for example, or for any type of recovery, is much larger than that of the adult, and any innovation or discovery provides very useful information which should be shared worldwide to learn and advance the development of the field of transplantation and even raise it in the adult world.

The objective of our Research Topic is to collect interesting aspects of solid organ transplantation in pediatrics, paying special attention to those points that differentiate it from solid organ transplantation in adults. We include all kinds of solid organs in the research (liver, kidney, lung, heart, intestine), even combined solid organ transplantation (e.g. liver and kidney, multivisceral, etc.). Articles can be focused on both surgical and medical aspects, immunological advances, and quality of life, and need to be innovative so that the provided information can contribute to the knowledge of the field.

Case reports and original articles can be included in the Research Topic if they have not been described before and can contribute to the development of science. Both physicians and surgeons must choose an innovative case or treatment or transplant modality and share the results with the medical community. Retrospective studies, reviews, and case studies are also welcome. A thorough review of the literature related to the case is recommended, particularly in case reports.

Specific topics that we would like the contributors to address include challenges and changes in waiting list criteria, risk factors for both graft and patient survival, technical challenges, combined transplants such as liver-kidney or multivisceral, types of transplant donation including the non-heart-beating donor experience in children, immunosuppression protocols, including the use of steroids, difficulties in the administration of immunosuppressants in children, immunological studies before transplant and throughout the follow-up, quality of life, and immunological tolerance in children.

Keywords: pediatric liver transplantation, pediatric kidney transplantation, pediatric lung transplantation, pediatric heart transplantation, pediatric intestinal transplantation, pediatric multivisceral transplantation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Solid organ transplantation has evolved a lot in the last few decades. In children, these advances are even more surprising. Limits have been crossed in children with complex pathologies, very low weight, tumors with uncertain prognoses, etc. that a few decades ago would not have been considered transplant candidates. After transplant, the use of cellular therapies, or the withdrawal of immunosuppression after developing immunological complications, are scenarios that occur in selected cases and that have made us learn in the field. This is common for all solid organs, such as transplantation of the liver, kidney, intestine, heart, or lung.

There is much less scientific evidence on all these advances in pediatrics and pediatric transplantation always lags somewhat behind adult transplants due to the lower number of cases. However, the plasticity of the child to achieve immunological tolerance, for example, or for any type of recovery, is much larger than that of the adult, and any innovation or discovery provides very useful information which should be shared worldwide to learn and advance the development of the field of transplantation and even raise it in the adult world.

The objective of our Research Topic is to collect interesting aspects of solid organ transplantation in pediatrics, paying special attention to those points that differentiate it from solid organ transplantation in adults. We include all kinds of solid organs in the research (liver, kidney, lung, heart, intestine), even combined solid organ transplantation (e.g. liver and kidney, multivisceral, etc.). Articles can be focused on both surgical and medical aspects, immunological advances, and quality of life, and need to be innovative so that the provided information can contribute to the knowledge of the field.

Case reports and original articles can be included in the Research Topic if they have not been described before and can contribute to the development of science. Both physicians and surgeons must choose an innovative case or treatment or transplant modality and share the results with the medical community. Retrospective studies, reviews, and case studies are also welcome. A thorough review of the literature related to the case is recommended, particularly in case reports.

Specific topics that we would like the contributors to address include challenges and changes in waiting list criteria, risk factors for both graft and patient survival, technical challenges, combined transplants such as liver-kidney or multivisceral, types of transplant donation including the non-heart-beating donor experience in children, immunosuppression protocols, including the use of steroids, difficulties in the administration of immunosuppressants in children, immunological studies before transplant and throughout the follow-up, quality of life, and immunological tolerance in children.

Keywords: pediatric liver transplantation, pediatric kidney transplantation, pediatric lung transplantation, pediatric heart transplantation, pediatric intestinal transplantation, pediatric multivisceral transplantation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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