About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 14 November 2022

Stroke survivors present with a wide range of neurological, physical, and psychological sequela. Post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia is an important complication that is associated with poor clinical outcomes and adversely affects patients’ quality of life. Stroke survivors show a rapid rate of cognitive impairment approximately 3 to 6 months after the stroke. Stroke is the leading cause of dementia worldwide. Advances in acute stroke therapy have contributed to a significant reduction in stroke-induced mortality rates. Increased life expectancy and a growing elderly population have led to a significant increase in the number of stroke survivors.

Cognitive impairment is more common in patients with post-stroke epilepsy than in stroke survivors without post-stroke epilepsy. Previous reports showed approximately 30% of patients with post-stroke epilepsy showed cognitive impairment. Research suggests that mechanisms that contribute to post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia may tend to overlap in stroke survivors. Recent reports have implicated amyloid-β deposits as a pathogenetic contributor to both epilepsy and cognitive decline. Amyloid-β deposition is also thought to be affected by vascular conditions and stroke. However, there a few reports about the associations- between anyloid- β, vascular conditions, cognitive impairment and post-stroke epilepsy. In this research topic, we will discuss the mechanism, risk, management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia in stroke survivors, and address the interaction between post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia.

We welcome any types of manuscripts supported by the Journal – comprised of original research article, brief research article, case report, review, mini-review, and meta-analysis, pertaining, but not limited to, the following themes:
• Mechanisms of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• Prediction and management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• The association between small vessel diseases, post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• Management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• The role of Amyloid-β for epilepsy and dementia in stroke survivors
• Neuroimaging assessment of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• The impact of stroke on post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• Novel technologies or discoveries applying the diagnosis or management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia

Tomotaka Tanaka received speaker's honoraria from Daiichi Sankyo, Eisai, and UCB Japan, and received a research grant from UCB Japan. The other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.

Keywords: post-stroke epilepsy, vascular dementia, small vessel disease, stroke survivors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Stroke survivors present with a wide range of neurological, physical, and psychological sequela. Post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia is an important complication that is associated with poor clinical outcomes and adversely affects patients’ quality of life. Stroke survivors show a rapid rate of cognitive impairment approximately 3 to 6 months after the stroke. Stroke is the leading cause of dementia worldwide. Advances in acute stroke therapy have contributed to a significant reduction in stroke-induced mortality rates. Increased life expectancy and a growing elderly population have led to a significant increase in the number of stroke survivors.

Cognitive impairment is more common in patients with post-stroke epilepsy than in stroke survivors without post-stroke epilepsy. Previous reports showed approximately 30% of patients with post-stroke epilepsy showed cognitive impairment. Research suggests that mechanisms that contribute to post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia may tend to overlap in stroke survivors. Recent reports have implicated amyloid-β deposits as a pathogenetic contributor to both epilepsy and cognitive decline. Amyloid-β deposition is also thought to be affected by vascular conditions and stroke. However, there a few reports about the associations- between anyloid- β, vascular conditions, cognitive impairment and post-stroke epilepsy. In this research topic, we will discuss the mechanism, risk, management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia in stroke survivors, and address the interaction between post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia.

We welcome any types of manuscripts supported by the Journal – comprised of original research article, brief research article, case report, review, mini-review, and meta-analysis, pertaining, but not limited to, the following themes:
• Mechanisms of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• Prediction and management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• The association between small vessel diseases, post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• Management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• The role of Amyloid-β for epilepsy and dementia in stroke survivors
• Neuroimaging assessment of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• The impact of stroke on post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia
• Novel technologies or discoveries applying the diagnosis or management of post-stroke epilepsy and vascular dementia

Tomotaka Tanaka received speaker's honoraria from Daiichi Sankyo, Eisai, and UCB Japan, and received a research grant from UCB Japan. The other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.

Keywords: post-stroke epilepsy, vascular dementia, small vessel disease, stroke survivors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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