About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 28 November 2022

As we enter the era of the edu-metaverse, extended reality (XR)—which includes augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and mixed reality (MR), to some extent—has become a major facilitator in various walks of life, especially the industries of internet, engineering, medical science and so on. Meanwhile, XR has begun to penetrate different aspects of second/foreign language (L2) education with the hope to provide learners with increased opportunities to experience immersive, multi-sensory, and interactive modes of learning. There is therefore an urgent need for educators to understand the essence and complexity of incorporating these technologies into in-class and out-of-class language education, especially from a psychological perspective.
It is suggested that for key stakeholders to better understand its use and unpack the mystery of technology in language learning, it seems imperative to go beyond the technological dimension and adopt a trans-disciplinary approach to XR. Such an approach would cross-disciplinary knowledge, agents, and cultures. Special attention to the various psychological opportunities and challenges brought by XR in language learning is of prime importance. To capture the psychological nature of XR-related language learning, this special issue encourages new insights into the willingness to communicate, motivation, engagement, self-regulation, boredom, anxiety, and learning strategies in using XR in second/foreign language education. Both empirical and non-empirical studies are of interest as they are of great value to inform research, teaching practices, and policy-making.

As such, the editors would like to invite contributions to the investigation of psychological benefits and barriers when using emerging technologies in L2 learning, including but not restricted to the following themes:
• Learners’ and teachers’ subjective experiences and perceptions of using XR in L2 learning;
• Theories, approaches, and models of psychological contributors and barriers in relation to XR in L2 learning;
• Individual differences (e.g., personality traits, emotional components, and learning strategies) in using XR in L2 education;
• Relationship between learners and teachers when using XR in L2 education.

Keywords: foreign language, second language, language learning, metaverse, XR


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

As we enter the era of the edu-metaverse, extended reality (XR)—which includes augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and mixed reality (MR), to some extent—has become a major facilitator in various walks of life, especially the industries of internet, engineering, medical science and so on. Meanwhile, XR has begun to penetrate different aspects of second/foreign language (L2) education with the hope to provide learners with increased opportunities to experience immersive, multi-sensory, and interactive modes of learning. There is therefore an urgent need for educators to understand the essence and complexity of incorporating these technologies into in-class and out-of-class language education, especially from a psychological perspective.
It is suggested that for key stakeholders to better understand its use and unpack the mystery of technology in language learning, it seems imperative to go beyond the technological dimension and adopt a trans-disciplinary approach to XR. Such an approach would cross-disciplinary knowledge, agents, and cultures. Special attention to the various psychological opportunities and challenges brought by XR in language learning is of prime importance. To capture the psychological nature of XR-related language learning, this special issue encourages new insights into the willingness to communicate, motivation, engagement, self-regulation, boredom, anxiety, and learning strategies in using XR in second/foreign language education. Both empirical and non-empirical studies are of interest as they are of great value to inform research, teaching practices, and policy-making.

As such, the editors would like to invite contributions to the investigation of psychological benefits and barriers when using emerging technologies in L2 learning, including but not restricted to the following themes:
• Learners’ and teachers’ subjective experiences and perceptions of using XR in L2 learning;
• Theories, approaches, and models of psychological contributors and barriers in relation to XR in L2 learning;
• Individual differences (e.g., personality traits, emotional components, and learning strategies) in using XR in L2 education;
• Relationship between learners and teachers when using XR in L2 education.

Keywords: foreign language, second language, language learning, metaverse, XR


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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