Research Topic

Mechanisms involved in eosinophil recruitment

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Blood and/or tissue eosinophilia is a hallmark in allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Cell migration along a chemokine gradient plays a major role in directed cell movement to the inflammatory site. After tissue infiltration with eosinophils, their cytotoxic function is activated by the ...

Blood and/or tissue eosinophilia is a hallmark in allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Cell migration along a chemokine gradient plays a major role in directed cell movement to the inflammatory site. After tissue infiltration with eosinophils, their cytotoxic function is activated by the proper stimuli to secrete a number of cationic proteins including the major basic protein, the eosinophil peroxidase, the eosinophil cationic protein and the eosinophil derived neurotoxin. The release of these proteins contributes to the hypersensitivity reaction and to tissue damage of the airway. Chemokine-mediated signal transduction is believed to involve calcium mobilization, protein kinase C, and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins in a classical view, and kinases and phosphatases, adapter proteins, and small GTP-binding proteins in an alternative view. In this context, complex interactions between the chemokine and its specific receptor on the surface of eosinophil, may involve the contribution of co-receptors, adhesion molecules, kinases, phosphatases and cytoskeletal elements. Articles demonstrating involvement of these events in vivo and in vitro, especially in the last decade are in continuous evolution. Moreover, allergen provocation of allergic patients demonstrated the involvement of these events in allergic airways eosinophilic inflammation. Therefore, the cellular and molecular events involved in eosinophil chemotaxis remain of current interest. The aim of this specific topic is to gather information of the ongoing research in this area for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in eosinophil chemotaxis. In particular, correlation between fundamental research, translational and clinical studies is needed. This would open channels for effective therapeutic modalities aiming at treating allergic eosinophilic inflammation.
We welcome submissions from basic to clinical studies exploring the cellular and molecular events resulting in eosinophil recruitment. Original research articles, short communications and reviews are all welcome.
Topics of interest include but not limited to:
• Role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment
• Co-receptors as effector partners to chemokine receptors in inducing eosinophil recruitment
• Protein kinases and phosphatases involved in the signal transduction of eosinophil chemotaxis
• Cytoskeleton and its function in recruiting eosinophils
• Molecular events associated with airway eosinophilia


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top