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Manuscript Submission Deadline 31 March 2023
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 31 July 2023

An essential component of our Universe that can be detected from its gravitational pull rather than its luminosity is termed dark matter. The luminous content of our Universe consists of roughly 3%. The remaining 97% content of the Universe consists of dark energy and dark matter. Dark matter is assumed to ...

An essential component of our Universe that can be detected from its gravitational pull rather than its luminosity is termed dark matter. The luminous content of our Universe consists of roughly 3%. The remaining 97% content of the Universe consists of dark energy and dark matter. Dark matter is assumed to consist of 27% of the total content of our Universe. Zwicky was the first who used the virial theorem to assert the existence of dark matter in galaxies. It is believed that spiral galaxies have Universal Rotation Curves (URC), and the presence of dark matter in the galactic halos can be confirmed by its gravitational pull on the URC of the spiral galaxy. More recently, particle candidates with appreciable thermal velocities at early times and thus behave as warm rather than cold, dark matter has received renewed attention.

Dark energy has become one of the dominant problems in theoretical physics since its discovery in 1998. Although a lot of theoretical work has been done on dark energy, there is still empty room in the research field to constrain such theoretical models to be consistent with the observational data. Theoretical physicists welcome the idea that space contains energy whose gravitational effect approximates that of Einstein’s cosmological constant; today, the concept is termed as dark energy. Black holes and neutron stars are fascinating astrophysical objects which perform manifestations of massive gravity, such as the formation of gigantic jets of particles and disruption of neighboring stars.

Theoretical physicists suggest checking the imprints of dark matter and dark energy on astrophysical compact objects. Dark matter could be composed of compact dark objects. These objects are assumed to have small non-gravitational interactions with normal matter and could be primordial black holes. By describing the astrophysical compact objects in the background of different dark matter and dark energy models, we can investigate the gravitational perturbations and explore the various aspects of astrophysical compact objects as follows:

(1) Theoretical, experimental, and observational mechanisms and analysis, including laboratory arrangements and tools for identifying the presence of dark matter and dark energy;
(2) Computational and numerical techniques and simulations for the existence of dark matter and dark energy in astrophysical objects;
(3) Novel development and refinement of relevant mathematical protocols for dark energy and dark matter;
(4) Significance of additional resources on existing literature related to dark matter and dark energy sources;
(5) Novel studies based on theoretical, observational, or numerical methods on particular issues related to dark matter and dark energy;
(6) Observational support and validation of previously published theoretical models related to dark matter and dark energy;
(7) Global challenges faced by theoretical physicists to model the dark sources and their structure would be resolved in a scholarly manner.

Topics addressed in this Research Topic include, but are not limited to:

• Thermal and dynamical aspects of black holes surrounded by dark energy
• Theoretical models of the astrophysical system containing dark matter and dark energy
• ΛCDM and gravastars models – main sources of dark energy
• Accretion of dark energy onto compact objects
• Cosmological models in modified theories of gravity
• Modified gravity as an alternative of dark energy
• Dark matter and supermassive black holes
• Dark matter inspired astrophysical compact objects in Verlinde’s emergent gravity
• Galaxy rotation curve-a theoretical approach to predict the presence of dark matter
• Impact of dark matter and dark energy on gravitational waves observations
• The inflationary Universe with dark matter and dark energy
• Tidal deformations of dark matter inspired black holes
• Evolution and stability of dark matter inspired astrophysical systems
• Observational constraints on the theoretical models of dark matter and dark energy

Keywords: dark matter, dark energy, black hole, neutron stars


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