Research Topic

Applications of Novel Analytical Methods in Epidemiology

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Through the past decades, the repertoire of analytical techniques in disciplines such as ecology, social sciences, and evolutionary biology has grown vastly following the development and availability of computational resources. Integration into veterinary epidemiology of cutting-edge, quantitative tools ...

Through the past decades, the repertoire of analytical techniques in disciplines such as ecology, social sciences, and evolutionary biology has grown vastly following the development and availability of computational resources. Integration into veterinary epidemiology of cutting-edge, quantitative tools borrowed from different disciplines offers opportunities to advance the study of disease dynamics in animal populations.

The objective of this Research Topic is to contribute to current methods in epidemiology by: 1) presenting and discussing novel analytical tools that help advance our understanding of epidemiology; and 2) demonstrating how inferences emerging from the application of new tools can be incorporated into decision-making processes related to animal health.

We welcome submissions that describe novel analytical methods applied in the context of epidemiology. These might include, but are not limited to:

1. Social network theory, including analysis of dynamic networks and integration of genetic and epidemiologic data with contact networks.
2. Advanced methods in the context of spatial epidemiology of animal pathogens (for example, Bayesian space and space-time structured regression methods, multivariable space-time cluster detection methods, ecological niche models).
3. Bayesian phylodynamic methods in the context of evolutionary epidemiology of animal pathogens.
4. Enhancement of decision-making through integration of epidemiological methods – such as risk analysis and disease spread modelling – using methods from decision-analysis.
5. Novel methods for sensitivity analysis used in an epidemiological context.

The term novel in our Research Topic indicates up-to-date methodological approaches that might be currently used in disciplines other than epidemiology, but are currently not used, or have only been used in limited studies, in epidemiology. We expect authors to demonstrate the utility of such methods in disease prevention, control, or eradication, including discussions of an approach’s strength and weaknesses. Studies that involve zoonotic as well as non-zoonotic infectious disease agents in both domestic and wild animal populations are encouraged. We welcome original research, methods, and review manuscripts. The ultimate goal of this Research Topic is to show-case current, cutting-edge, analytical tools that can be used to advance understanding of the epidemiology of endemic, emerging and re-emerging diseases.


Keywords: Spatial epidemiology, Evolutionary epidemiology, Social network analysis, Risk assessment, Disease Surveillance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top