Research Topic

Birth

About this Research Topic

Birth, which so well demonstrates the tensions, as well as the interconnections, between the natural and the social, is a universal aspect of living organisms, but is nonetheless subject to widely differing understandings, practices and management.. Birth is the subject of cultural representations, for example within popular culture, where meanings are made and every day assumptions generated and reinforced about human and non-human birth. Birth is also subject to dispute, disagreement and however natural and inevitable, can also be political.
We seek to interrogate a number of different aspects of birth, especially the role of expertise and whose knowledge counts as well as the invocation of the natural in scientific and scholarly debate. For example, in the case of human and non-human experience of birth a range of different discourses are implicated, such as ethical discussion about reproductive technologies, cloning, fertility treatment, multiple births, and births which involve the DNA of three parties. We welcome interdisciplinary discussion which explores the interrelationship between human and non human birth processes. Furthermore, we are looking for papers that investigate the liminal spaces between the human and non-human, such as that highlighted in some of Donna Haraway’s work on companion species and Sarah Franklin’s work on cloning and transformations of reproduction across species.
We suggest some particularly pertinent questions in order to progress this topic, but are open to submissions that offer different perspectives and pose different questions about the productive potential of a research topic on birth:

Questions
At an historical moment in the expansion of what Haraway has called technoscience, how do technological and scientific developments and interventions transform the experience as well as the management of birth-for human and non-human animals?

How far is it possible to extract what is natural from what is social in such a fast moving, interventionist field?

How do birth practices shape and influence sex, gender and gender relations?

What is the relationship between the different forces at play in the organization of birth across the world in the twenty first century? How political is birth and what are the moral issues to be addressed by those involved?

What ethical aspects are raised by reproductive technologies, ranging from IVF to cloning and including the facilitation, management or prevention of birth through contraception or termination of pregnancy?

What is the impact of dominant cultural representations of birth? For example, how far do humans understand birth through animal reproduction for example in films and television programmes as well as pedagogy in schools?
To what extent do humans understand maternity and maternal behaviour through exposure to non-human mothering and how do humans perceive non-human motherhood?


Keywords: birth, human, non-human, boundaries, relationality, reproduction, companion species


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Birth, which so well demonstrates the tensions, as well as the interconnections, between the natural and the social, is a universal aspect of living organisms, but is nonetheless subject to widely differing understandings, practices and management.. Birth is the subject of cultural representations, for example within popular culture, where meanings are made and every day assumptions generated and reinforced about human and non-human birth. Birth is also subject to dispute, disagreement and however natural and inevitable, can also be political.
We seek to interrogate a number of different aspects of birth, especially the role of expertise and whose knowledge counts as well as the invocation of the natural in scientific and scholarly debate. For example, in the case of human and non-human experience of birth a range of different discourses are implicated, such as ethical discussion about reproductive technologies, cloning, fertility treatment, multiple births, and births which involve the DNA of three parties. We welcome interdisciplinary discussion which explores the interrelationship between human and non human birth processes. Furthermore, we are looking for papers that investigate the liminal spaces between the human and non-human, such as that highlighted in some of Donna Haraway’s work on companion species and Sarah Franklin’s work on cloning and transformations of reproduction across species.
We suggest some particularly pertinent questions in order to progress this topic, but are open to submissions that offer different perspectives and pose different questions about the productive potential of a research topic on birth:

Questions
At an historical moment in the expansion of what Haraway has called technoscience, how do technological and scientific developments and interventions transform the experience as well as the management of birth-for human and non-human animals?

How far is it possible to extract what is natural from what is social in such a fast moving, interventionist field?

How do birth practices shape and influence sex, gender and gender relations?

What is the relationship between the different forces at play in the organization of birth across the world in the twenty first century? How political is birth and what are the moral issues to be addressed by those involved?

What ethical aspects are raised by reproductive technologies, ranging from IVF to cloning and including the facilitation, management or prevention of birth through contraception or termination of pregnancy?

What is the impact of dominant cultural representations of birth? For example, how far do humans understand birth through animal reproduction for example in films and television programmes as well as pedagogy in schools?
To what extent do humans understand maternity and maternal behaviour through exposure to non-human mothering and how do humans perceive non-human motherhood?


Keywords: birth, human, non-human, boundaries, relationality, reproduction, companion species


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

10 February 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top