Research Topic

Post-Translational Modifications in Plant Nuclear Signaling: Novel Insights into Responses to Environmental Changes

About this Research Topic

Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are modifications of proteins occurring after or during their synthesis, that are covalent and usually mediated by enzymes. PTMs include phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, methylation, sumoylation, and others that are of major importance to control the ...

Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are modifications of proteins occurring after or during their synthesis, that are covalent and usually mediated by enzymes. PTMs include phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, methylation, sumoylation, and others that are of major importance to control the responses of plant cells to changes in their environment. PTMs affect the activity, the intracellular location, the stability, or the interaction with different partners of target proteins, leading to the transduction of a specific signal. In some cases, target proteins are impacted by several PTMs that can have synergetic or antagonistic effects, thus modulating the specificity and the strength of the signal.

To achieve PTMs plant cells express large families of highly specialized enzymes. These families of enzymes, and the consequences on their target proteins, are largely described both at the plasma membrane and cytosolic levels. In an effort to better understand the nuclear transduction processes that control gene expression upon the detection of environmental clues at the cell surface, researchers recently focused their attention on nuclear PTMs that target the transcription machinery and its regulators in the nucleus.

We already know that many enzymes performing PTMs are present in the nucleus, such as protein kinases and phosphatases, protein acetyltransferases and deacetylases, protein methyltransferases and demethylases, protein involved in SUMOylation. Some of them have a strict nuclear location, such as many histone deacetylases (HDACs) whereas others such as Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) can in some conditions translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus to ensure a continuum in the signal transduction pathways between the cytosol and the nucleus.

The aim of this Research Topic is to highlight significant scientific breakthroughs related to nuclear PTMs in various physiological conditions, such as biotic stresses, plant immunity, or development. Manuscripts of interest will focus either on the enzymes involved in PTMs and their regulation, and/or on the molecular consequences of their activity on their nuclear target proteins, in a context of plant cell responses to changes in their biotic or abiotic environment. We welcome the submission of the following article types: Original Research, Review, General Commentary, Opinion, and Protocols.


Keywords: Nucleus, Post-translational modifications, Signaling pathways, Stress responses


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Submission Deadlines

01 October 2017 Manuscript
15 February 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 October 2017 Manuscript
15 February 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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