Research Topic

Movement Disorders and Sleep – Underlying Mechanisms, Clinical Aspects and Treatment

About this Research Topic

Mechanisms involved in human motor control are very complex. There are different structures implicated: basal ganglia, cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord and peripheral system.
Human motor control and sleep is an interdisciplinary field which involve two different fields: movement disorders and sleep medicine. Movement disorders specialists are more familiar with the different types of movements during daytime. Sleep specialists are assessing motor abnormalities during sleep at night.

The aim of this Research Topic is to offer a complex picture of movement disorders in sleep and the sleep in different types of movement disorders. Review articles and clinical studies are welcome. There will be an overview of the main sleep problems (insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, periodic limb movement disorders, nocturnal leg cramps, sleep talking, REM sleep and non-REM sleep parasomnias, other motor problems during sleep) and their classification. Details related to circadian rhythms, sleep-wake cycle are offered.

Different aspects would be detailed: how to approach sleep dysfunction in a movement disorders patient, how to assess them using questionnaires, scales, and instrumental using actigraphy, video-polysomnography, scoring of sleep-related movements, neuroimaging, differential diagnosis of motor problems during sleep.

Sleep is a period of rest during the 24-hours period. Hence, there is need an inhibition of the normal motor control during day. Motor control dysfunction would be described in REM sleep behavior disorders. There will be diagnostic criteria and explanation on how idiopatic RBD evolve over years into a synucleopathy (Parkinson’s disease, multiple system atrophy, Lewy body dementia). Restless legs syndrome is an important underreported topic. There are some clinical features of PD that overlap with RLS symptoms. Periodic limb movement disorders are encountered by 80% of these patients. There are different clinical features (rigidity, motor fluctuations, dystonia etc.) that could interfere with the patient’s description. There would also be descriptions of sleep dysfunctions in different type of movement disorders.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Mechanisms involved in human motor control are very complex. There are different structures implicated: basal ganglia, cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord and peripheral system.
Human motor control and sleep is an interdisciplinary field which involve two different fields: movement disorders and sleep medicine. Movement disorders specialists are more familiar with the different types of movements during daytime. Sleep specialists are assessing motor abnormalities during sleep at night.

The aim of this Research Topic is to offer a complex picture of movement disorders in sleep and the sleep in different types of movement disorders. Review articles and clinical studies are welcome. There will be an overview of the main sleep problems (insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, periodic limb movement disorders, nocturnal leg cramps, sleep talking, REM sleep and non-REM sleep parasomnias, other motor problems during sleep) and their classification. Details related to circadian rhythms, sleep-wake cycle are offered.

Different aspects would be detailed: how to approach sleep dysfunction in a movement disorders patient, how to assess them using questionnaires, scales, and instrumental using actigraphy, video-polysomnography, scoring of sleep-related movements, neuroimaging, differential diagnosis of motor problems during sleep.

Sleep is a period of rest during the 24-hours period. Hence, there is need an inhibition of the normal motor control during day. Motor control dysfunction would be described in REM sleep behavior disorders. There will be diagnostic criteria and explanation on how idiopatic RBD evolve over years into a synucleopathy (Parkinson’s disease, multiple system atrophy, Lewy body dementia). Restless legs syndrome is an important underreported topic. There are some clinical features of PD that overlap with RLS symptoms. Periodic limb movement disorders are encountered by 80% of these patients. There are different clinical features (rigidity, motor fluctuations, dystonia etc.) that could interfere with the patient’s description. There would also be descriptions of sleep dysfunctions in different type of movement disorders.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2017 Manuscript
31 January 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2017 Manuscript
31 January 2018 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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