Research Topic

Quantitative Analysis of Biofilms

About this Research Topic

Biofilms are structurally, phenotypically, and compositionally diverse bacterial communities. Biofilm phenotypes observable by eye are often the result of complex interactions and interconnected chemical, physical, and genetic processes. Quantitative methods of assessing single-cell and population level behaviors tease out some of these intermediating phenomena and identify latent phenotypes. Developments in new quantitative techniques include new genetic tools, in situ chemical sensors, imaging technologies, microfabricated growth environments, population modeling techniques, and spectroscopic and mass spectrometry. These methods have all contributed to recent advances in the understanding of the factors determining bacterial behavior and function within biofilms.

In this Research Topic, we aim to highlight groundbreaking work in the development and/or application of quantitative analysis methods to bacterial biofilms, with a focus on those studies resulting in the discovery of new phenomena regulating biofilm initiation, development, function, or dispersal. We especially encourage the submission of work applying physical, analytical, and modeling methods to generate insights into the interactions that shape biofilms and determine their function and biological outcomes.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Biofilms are structurally, phenotypically, and compositionally diverse bacterial communities. Biofilm phenotypes observable by eye are often the result of complex interactions and interconnected chemical, physical, and genetic processes. Quantitative methods of assessing single-cell and population level behaviors tease out some of these intermediating phenomena and identify latent phenotypes. Developments in new quantitative techniques include new genetic tools, in situ chemical sensors, imaging technologies, microfabricated growth environments, population modeling techniques, and spectroscopic and mass spectrometry. These methods have all contributed to recent advances in the understanding of the factors determining bacterial behavior and function within biofilms.

In this Research Topic, we aim to highlight groundbreaking work in the development and/or application of quantitative analysis methods to bacterial biofilms, with a focus on those studies resulting in the discovery of new phenomena regulating biofilm initiation, development, function, or dispersal. We especially encourage the submission of work applying physical, analytical, and modeling methods to generate insights into the interactions that shape biofilms and determine their function and biological outcomes.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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