Research Topic

The Implications of Weight Bias Internalisation

About this Research Topic

There is now a wealth of evidence that demonstrates weight bias is reported by people of all ages and backgrounds, and discrimination has been evidenced across a range of settings including workplaces, schools, and education centres, and in healthcare. The potential impacts of weight bias are varied, including but not limited to, compromised psychosocial wellbeing, depressed mood, social isolation, and lower self-esteem. More recently research has demonstrated that weight bias internalisation is reported by higher weight people, with some reports suggesting that there is an association between weight bias internalisation and self-reported health, quality of life, and maladaptive health behaviours such as physical inactivity. Further work to identify the link between weight bias internalisation and health outcomes is warranted, and in particular, research that examines this association using objective measures of physical and mental health outcomes. Research that evidences these links is still in their infancy and further work to identify the implications of weight bias internalisation is needed given the widespread reports of weight bias and discriminatory experiences.

We encourage submissions to this Research Topic that seek to understand or address the influences and effects of weight bias internalisation. Sample topics may include implications for physical and mental health outcomes, patient engagement in health services, service access and adherence, and interventions. We particularly welcome multidisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary research that focuses on patient experiences, health outcomes, and mechanisms to reduce internalisation.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather the most recent research findings from experts in the field to evidence the impact of weight bias internalisation. To achieve this aim, this Research Topic will feature research that advances current knowledge on the impact of weight bias internalisation. Submissions of empirical, theoretical, methodological, opinion pieces, and commentaries are welcome.


Keywords: Weight Bias, Weight Stigma, Weight Discrimination, Internalisation, Obesity, Weight, Fat


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

There is now a wealth of evidence that demonstrates weight bias is reported by people of all ages and backgrounds, and discrimination has been evidenced across a range of settings including workplaces, schools, and education centres, and in healthcare. The potential impacts of weight bias are varied, including but not limited to, compromised psychosocial wellbeing, depressed mood, social isolation, and lower self-esteem. More recently research has demonstrated that weight bias internalisation is reported by higher weight people, with some reports suggesting that there is an association between weight bias internalisation and self-reported health, quality of life, and maladaptive health behaviours such as physical inactivity. Further work to identify the link between weight bias internalisation and health outcomes is warranted, and in particular, research that examines this association using objective measures of physical and mental health outcomes. Research that evidences these links is still in their infancy and further work to identify the implications of weight bias internalisation is needed given the widespread reports of weight bias and discriminatory experiences.

We encourage submissions to this Research Topic that seek to understand or address the influences and effects of weight bias internalisation. Sample topics may include implications for physical and mental health outcomes, patient engagement in health services, service access and adherence, and interventions. We particularly welcome multidisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary research that focuses on patient experiences, health outcomes, and mechanisms to reduce internalisation.

The aim of this Research Topic is to gather the most recent research findings from experts in the field to evidence the impact of weight bias internalisation. To achieve this aim, this Research Topic will feature research that advances current knowledge on the impact of weight bias internalisation. Submissions of empirical, theoretical, methodological, opinion pieces, and commentaries are welcome.


Keywords: Weight Bias, Weight Stigma, Weight Discrimination, Internalisation, Obesity, Weight, Fat


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 March 2018 Abstract
31 August 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 March 2018 Abstract
31 August 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top