Research Topic

Emerging Viruses: Host Immunity and Novel Therapeutic Interventions

About this Research Topic

Emerging and re-emerging infectious viruses have always been a major threat to human health. In recent years in particular, the rise of Avian and Swine Influenza Viruses, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV; MERS-CoV), Ebola virus, and most recently mosquito-borne Zika virus (Flavivirus), are becoming a global concern due to their pathogenicity, associated high mortality rate and socio-economical burden. These viruses mostly originate from animals but can cause disease and even death in humans (zoonoses). With frequent intercontinental travel and domestic living in high population density areas, the potential for these viruses to mutate, spread rapidly in human populations and cause global pandemics is a major concern.

Significant research efforts have led to the discoveries of complex intra- and extra-cellular signaling activation in host innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infection. Still, the immune system is often defeated by viral antagonistic proteins that suppress the host immune system resulting in immune evasion and diseases. Despite deeper understanding of the mechanisms of infection and of virus-host interactions, current therapeutic options remain limited. Furthermore, progress has been slow in the discovery of novel, next generation therapeutic options for many viral pathogens. This highlights the importance and urgency in the discovery and development of novel prevention and treatment strategies to combat ever mutating and emerging infectious viruses. Therefore, research in this area is of importance in preparation for sudden outbreaks and pandemics in the future.

This Research Topic aims to facilitate and strengthen our current understanding of the interactions between emerging infectious viruses and host immune responses, as well as insights into novel therapeutics that may be employed in the event of global pandemics.

We welcome the submission of Original Research and Review articles that cover, but are not limited to, infectious viruses including influenza virus, cornonavirus, filovirus, and flavivirus, in the following topics:

1. Mechanisms of viral infection including viral entry, replication, and assembly.
2. Innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infection at the site of infection.
3. Viral immune evasion mechanisms.
4. Novel vaccination strategies and therapeutic targets.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Emerging and re-emerging infectious viruses have always been a major threat to human health. In recent years in particular, the rise of Avian and Swine Influenza Viruses, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV; MERS-CoV), Ebola virus, and most recently mosquito-borne Zika virus (Flavivirus), are becoming a global concern due to their pathogenicity, associated high mortality rate and socio-economical burden. These viruses mostly originate from animals but can cause disease and even death in humans (zoonoses). With frequent intercontinental travel and domestic living in high population density areas, the potential for these viruses to mutate, spread rapidly in human populations and cause global pandemics is a major concern.

Significant research efforts have led to the discoveries of complex intra- and extra-cellular signaling activation in host innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infection. Still, the immune system is often defeated by viral antagonistic proteins that suppress the host immune system resulting in immune evasion and diseases. Despite deeper understanding of the mechanisms of infection and of virus-host interactions, current therapeutic options remain limited. Furthermore, progress has been slow in the discovery of novel, next generation therapeutic options for many viral pathogens. This highlights the importance and urgency in the discovery and development of novel prevention and treatment strategies to combat ever mutating and emerging infectious viruses. Therefore, research in this area is of importance in preparation for sudden outbreaks and pandemics in the future.

This Research Topic aims to facilitate and strengthen our current understanding of the interactions between emerging infectious viruses and host immune responses, as well as insights into novel therapeutics that may be employed in the event of global pandemics.

We welcome the submission of Original Research and Review articles that cover, but are not limited to, infectious viruses including influenza virus, cornonavirus, filovirus, and flavivirus, in the following topics:

1. Mechanisms of viral infection including viral entry, replication, and assembly.
2. Innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infection at the site of infection.
3. Viral immune evasion mechanisms.
4. Novel vaccination strategies and therapeutic targets.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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