Research Topic

NTM – The New Uber-Bugs

About this Research Topic

Incidence of pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) such as Mycobacterium abscessus and M. avium is increasing at an alarming rate, surpassing tuberculosis (TB) in many countries. Treatment duration is extremely long, usually lasting for 1-2 years, with a macrolides-based multi-drug regimen. However, the results are in general disappointing with low sputum conversion rates, resembling that of XDR-TB. There is an urgent need for improved diagnostics and more efficacious therapeutics, for a better understanding of epidemiology, host-pathogen interaction and pathophysiology of the bacteria. In this research topic, we plan to bring together experts from a range of disciplines addressing current status, gaps and needs, and new developments in all NTM-relevant research areas.

Specifically, this Research Topic will include various aspects of NTM such as disease presentation, pathology, diagnosis, treatment, drug resistance, epidemiology, genomics, host-pathogen interaction, immunology, vaccine development, pathophysiology of bacteria, drug discovery, animal models, and clinical drug development.


Keywords: Non-TB mycobacteria, NTM, drug resistance, drug discovery, host-pathogen interaction


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Incidence of pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) such as Mycobacterium abscessus and M. avium is increasing at an alarming rate, surpassing tuberculosis (TB) in many countries. Treatment duration is extremely long, usually lasting for 1-2 years, with a macrolides-based multi-drug regimen. However, the results are in general disappointing with low sputum conversion rates, resembling that of XDR-TB. There is an urgent need for improved diagnostics and more efficacious therapeutics, for a better understanding of epidemiology, host-pathogen interaction and pathophysiology of the bacteria. In this research topic, we plan to bring together experts from a range of disciplines addressing current status, gaps and needs, and new developments in all NTM-relevant research areas.

Specifically, this Research Topic will include various aspects of NTM such as disease presentation, pathology, diagnosis, treatment, drug resistance, epidemiology, genomics, host-pathogen interaction, immunology, vaccine development, pathophysiology of bacteria, drug discovery, animal models, and clinical drug development.


Keywords: Non-TB mycobacteria, NTM, drug resistance, drug discovery, host-pathogen interaction


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 January 2018 Abstract
31 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 January 2018 Abstract
31 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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