Research Topic

O-GlcNAcylation: Expanding the Frontiers

About this Research Topic

In 2014, we celebrated the 30 years anniversary of the discovery of a fascinating post-translational modification, O-GlcNAcylation, by editing a Research Topic in Frontiers in Endocrinology ("30 years old: O-GlcNAc reaches age of reason - Regulation of cell signaling and metabolism by O-GlcNAcylation."). In between, Frontiers in Endocrinology received its first impact factor, an honourable 3.67 to which Research Topics certainly contributed to reach.

As everyone can notice, time is speeding up and this is particularly true in Science. Almost four years now after launching the publication of this Research Topic, it seems to us that important progresses and new discoveries have been made in the field that justify of another issue on this subject.

Indeed, the development of tissue specific OGT/OGA knock out mice has provided new insights on the role of this modification in regulation of food intake, energy metabolism, thermogenesis, cardiac function, etc. In addition, the involvement of O-GlcNAcylation in epigenetic regulations, mitochondrial function, autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress have also recently attracted much attention. Finally, the role of O-GlcNAcylation in diabetic complications, neurodegenerative diseases and oncogenic processes has been largely confirmed and extended. New tools for studying O-GlcNAcylation homeostasis were developed and include several Click-chemistry based technologies. Also, while not completely deciphered, attempts have been made to better understand how OGT and OGA respectively transfers and removes the GlcNAc moiety on and off their plethora of substrates, as well as the former catalyses the proteolytic processing and maturation of Host-cell factor 1. Finally, the discovery of mutations in the OGT gene in patients with X-linked intellectual disability further emphasize the needs to explore the structure-function properties of this enzyme and its role in human pathologies. It thus seems to us that another Research Topic on O-GlcNAcylation would be a timely opportunity to discuss new discoveries, publish new results and welcome new comers in the field.


Keywords: O-GlcNAcylation, Post-translational modifications, Cell signaling, Metabolism, Human Diseases


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In 2014, we celebrated the 30 years anniversary of the discovery of a fascinating post-translational modification, O-GlcNAcylation, by editing a Research Topic in Frontiers in Endocrinology ("30 years old: O-GlcNAc reaches age of reason - Regulation of cell signaling and metabolism by O-GlcNAcylation."). In between, Frontiers in Endocrinology received its first impact factor, an honourable 3.67 to which Research Topics certainly contributed to reach.

As everyone can notice, time is speeding up and this is particularly true in Science. Almost four years now after launching the publication of this Research Topic, it seems to us that important progresses and new discoveries have been made in the field that justify of another issue on this subject.

Indeed, the development of tissue specific OGT/OGA knock out mice has provided new insights on the role of this modification in regulation of food intake, energy metabolism, thermogenesis, cardiac function, etc. In addition, the involvement of O-GlcNAcylation in epigenetic regulations, mitochondrial function, autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress have also recently attracted much attention. Finally, the role of O-GlcNAcylation in diabetic complications, neurodegenerative diseases and oncogenic processes has been largely confirmed and extended. New tools for studying O-GlcNAcylation homeostasis were developed and include several Click-chemistry based technologies. Also, while not completely deciphered, attempts have been made to better understand how OGT and OGA respectively transfers and removes the GlcNAc moiety on and off their plethora of substrates, as well as the former catalyses the proteolytic processing and maturation of Host-cell factor 1. Finally, the discovery of mutations in the OGT gene in patients with X-linked intellectual disability further emphasize the needs to explore the structure-function properties of this enzyme and its role in human pathologies. It thus seems to us that another Research Topic on O-GlcNAcylation would be a timely opportunity to discuss new discoveries, publish new results and welcome new comers in the field.


Keywords: O-GlcNAcylation, Post-translational modifications, Cell signaling, Metabolism, Human Diseases


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

19 January 2018 Abstract
21 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

19 January 2018 Abstract
21 May 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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