Research Topic

Innovative Technologies and Clinical Applications for Invasive and Non-Invasive Neuromodulation: From the Workbench to the Bedside

About this Research Topic

The possibility of harvesting the power of electric and magnetic impulses in the human body, commonly referred to as “neuromodulation,” is one of the most recent and promising developments of the modern science. Since the late ´60s, multiple invasive and non-invasive technologies have been developed and ...

The possibility of harvesting the power of electric and magnetic impulses in the human body, commonly referred to as “neuromodulation,” is one of the most recent and promising developments of the modern science. Since the late ´60s, multiple invasive and non-invasive technologies have been developed and tested in experimental and clinical settings with the final aim of modulating the function of the central and peripheral nervous system. Clinical applications include, but are not limited to, common neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.

The bulk of evidence supporting the clinical efficacy of various invasive and non-invasive approaches for neuromodulation has progressively led scientific societies, patients’ associations, and regulatory entities to acknowledge the critical role played by neuromodulation in the therapeutic algorithms of a wide range of neurological disorders. As a result, new technologies have been recently introduced into the market or are currently under validation. Their potential implementation into innovative protocols for neuromodulation demands a critical revision of what are the unmet needs for neuromodulation in movement disorders.

This Research Topic of Frontiers in Neurology aims to summarize and discuss opportunities and challenges for innovative technologies and programming strategies for invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.

Original articles may cover pre-clinical or clinical applications for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS), Vagal Nerve Stimulation (VNS), Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), or Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation (tDCS) in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. Particular attention will be devoted to translational articles addressing the effects of neuromodulation on biological tissues, as well as those focusing on modeling strategies and closed-loop technologies. Letters to the Editor, Viewpoints, Systematic Revisions and Meta-Analysis will also be considered for publication.


Keywords: non-invasive brain stimulation, deep-brain stimulation, neurophysiology, Parkinson’s disease movement disorders


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

18 December 2018 Manuscript

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Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

18 December 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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