Research Topic

Cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas

About this Research Topic

Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas comprise a group of lymphatic malignancies that occur primarily in the skin. They represent the commonest type of T-cell lymphomas in adults and the second most common form of extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. CTCL are characterized by heterogeneous clinical, histological, immunological, and molecular features. The most common type is mycosis fungoides and its leukemic variant, Sézary syndrome. The pathogenesis of CTCL remains obscure; long-term antigen stimulation is thought, through cytokine networks, to induce an inflammatory response with T-cell proliferation, leading to a clonal malignant T-cell with continuous expansion. The standard of care for CTCL remains to be defined and skin directed therapy is usually employed in disease localized to the skin and multi-agent chemotherapy and more aggressive treatment are usually reserved for advanced cases. In some aggressive subtypes of CTCLs, such as primary cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma and primary cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma, more aggressive treatment including bone marrow transplantation should be considered early. Current prognostic models for more common subtypes of CTCL have limitations as well and up to 30% of such patients progress and need aggressive treatment as well. In the past decade significant advances were made in understanding the biology, in diagnostic methods, prognostic schemes, and treatment paradigms for CTCL including the development of multiple novel small molecule therapeutics, monoclonal antibodies, phototherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, and cellular therapy approaches. The aim of this Research Topic is to describe the current and emerging paradigms in understanding biology and clinical management of patients with CTCL.


Keywords: Cutaneous lymphoma, T-cell, mycosis fungoides, sezary syndrome, phototherapy, chemotherapy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas comprise a group of lymphatic malignancies that occur primarily in the skin. They represent the commonest type of T-cell lymphomas in adults and the second most common form of extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. CTCL are characterized by heterogeneous clinical, histological, immunological, and molecular features. The most common type is mycosis fungoides and its leukemic variant, Sézary syndrome. The pathogenesis of CTCL remains obscure; long-term antigen stimulation is thought, through cytokine networks, to induce an inflammatory response with T-cell proliferation, leading to a clonal malignant T-cell with continuous expansion. The standard of care for CTCL remains to be defined and skin directed therapy is usually employed in disease localized to the skin and multi-agent chemotherapy and more aggressive treatment are usually reserved for advanced cases. In some aggressive subtypes of CTCLs, such as primary cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma and primary cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma, more aggressive treatment including bone marrow transplantation should be considered early. Current prognostic models for more common subtypes of CTCL have limitations as well and up to 30% of such patients progress and need aggressive treatment as well. In the past decade significant advances were made in understanding the biology, in diagnostic methods, prognostic schemes, and treatment paradigms for CTCL including the development of multiple novel small molecule therapeutics, monoclonal antibodies, phototherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, and cellular therapy approaches. The aim of this Research Topic is to describe the current and emerging paradigms in understanding biology and clinical management of patients with CTCL.


Keywords: Cutaneous lymphoma, T-cell, mycosis fungoides, sezary syndrome, phototherapy, chemotherapy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

15 December 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

15 December 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top
);