Research Topic

A New Generation of Organic Light-Emitting Materials and Devices

About this Research Topic

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have attracted significant interest as promising candidates for next-generation full-color displays and future solid-state lighting sources. The recombination of holes and electrons under electrical excitation typically generates 25% singlet excitons and 75% triplet excitons. For traditional fluorescent OLEDs, only 25% singlet excitons can be utilized to emit light, while the other 75% triplet excitons are generally wasted through nonradiative transition. By adopting noble metal phosphorescent complexes, an internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 100% could be achieved by utilizing both the 25% singlet excitons and 75% triplet excitons. However, these phosphors usually contain nonrenewable and high-cost iridium or platinum noble metals.

Most recently, unity IQE has been readily achieved through noble metal-free purely organic emitters, such as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters, hybridized local and charge-transfer state (HLCT) “hot exciton” emitters, and neutral  radical emitters, etc. In addition, the combination of conventional hole-transport and electron-transport materials in an appropriate device structure can also provide an uncommon efficiency. Both strategies are essential and attractive for high-performance and low-cost full-color displays and white OLED applications.

As such, this Research Topic will focus on this new generation of organic light-emitting materials and devices, including design, synthesis, and characterization of light-emitting low-mass organic molecules, oligomers, dendrimers, polymers, and their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Contributions relating to carrier transporting materials, host materials, new concept OLED materials, and high performance OLEDs with new organic materials are also encouraged.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have attracted significant interest as promising candidates for next-generation full-color displays and future solid-state lighting sources. The recombination of holes and electrons under electrical excitation typically generates 25% singlet excitons and 75% triplet excitons. For traditional fluorescent OLEDs, only 25% singlet excitons can be utilized to emit light, while the other 75% triplet excitons are generally wasted through nonradiative transition. By adopting noble metal phosphorescent complexes, an internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 100% could be achieved by utilizing both the 25% singlet excitons and 75% triplet excitons. However, these phosphors usually contain nonrenewable and high-cost iridium or platinum noble metals.

Most recently, unity IQE has been readily achieved through noble metal-free purely organic emitters, such as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters, hybridized local and charge-transfer state (HLCT) “hot exciton” emitters, and neutral  radical emitters, etc. In addition, the combination of conventional hole-transport and electron-transport materials in an appropriate device structure can also provide an uncommon efficiency. Both strategies are essential and attractive for high-performance and low-cost full-color displays and white OLED applications.

As such, this Research Topic will focus on this new generation of organic light-emitting materials and devices, including design, synthesis, and characterization of light-emitting low-mass organic molecules, oligomers, dendrimers, polymers, and their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Contributions relating to carrier transporting materials, host materials, new concept OLED materials, and high performance OLEDs with new organic materials are also encouraged.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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