Research Topic

Forces in Biology - Cell and Developmental Mechanobiology and Its Implications in Disease

About this Research Topic

Cellular mechanics is a fundamental determinant of cell and tissue patterning. Numerous cellular processes including cell migration, division, differentiation and programmed cell death are influenced by the mechanical property of cells. These cellular processes must be regulated with high precision from the molecular to multicellular level. Thus, ensuring that each cell is able to undergo its designated fate, based on external cues and internal machinery. Indeed, individual cells within tissues constantly sense their neighbours and matrix by transmission of mechanochemical signals to coordinate these cellular processes. Of note, misregulation of these mechanochemical signals can lead to pathological consequences such as cancer, suppressed immunity and neurodegenerative diseases.
 
Recent advances in the regulation of cellular mechanics have profoundly impacted our understanding of tissue morphogenesis. For example, variation in the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix leads to different types of collective cell migration that determines tissue patterning. Moreover, mechanochemical signaling pathways can control both cellular dynamics (at a short timescale) and gene expression (at longer time scales), whose co-regulation is critical for the self-organization of cells into tissues.
 
We welcome biologists, physicists, and mathematician to contribute to this issue. In this research topic, we seek out for commentaries, reviews and original research articles that provide interesting insights or new biological observations including but not limited to the following areas.

- Mechanobiology at the molecular/cellular/tissue scale, employing experimental/modeling/theoretical approaches.
- Quantitative analysis of cellular mechanics (single cell and tissue level)
- Biochemical and physical properties of cellular structures that generate and/or transmit force.
- Mechanochemical signaling and feedback loops that control cellular metabolism and gene expression.
- Mechanobiology of cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions
- Mechanotransduction in cell division, migration, tissue homeostasis, immune defense, stem cell fate specification/differentiation, tissue patterning and cell extrusion.
- Mechanobiology of molecular, cellular and developmental processes related to cancer, neurodegeneration, inflammatory diseases.
- Mechanobiology of cellular pathologies such as centrosome amplification, whole genome doubling, nuclear envelope abnormalities, oncogenic transformation and senescence.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cellular mechanics is a fundamental determinant of cell and tissue patterning. Numerous cellular processes including cell migration, division, differentiation and programmed cell death are influenced by the mechanical property of cells. These cellular processes must be regulated with high precision from the molecular to multicellular level. Thus, ensuring that each cell is able to undergo its designated fate, based on external cues and internal machinery. Indeed, individual cells within tissues constantly sense their neighbours and matrix by transmission of mechanochemical signals to coordinate these cellular processes. Of note, misregulation of these mechanochemical signals can lead to pathological consequences such as cancer, suppressed immunity and neurodegenerative diseases.
 
Recent advances in the regulation of cellular mechanics have profoundly impacted our understanding of tissue morphogenesis. For example, variation in the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix leads to different types of collective cell migration that determines tissue patterning. Moreover, mechanochemical signaling pathways can control both cellular dynamics (at a short timescale) and gene expression (at longer time scales), whose co-regulation is critical for the self-organization of cells into tissues.
 
We welcome biologists, physicists, and mathematician to contribute to this issue. In this research topic, we seek out for commentaries, reviews and original research articles that provide interesting insights or new biological observations including but not limited to the following areas.

- Mechanobiology at the molecular/cellular/tissue scale, employing experimental/modeling/theoretical approaches.
- Quantitative analysis of cellular mechanics (single cell and tissue level)
- Biochemical and physical properties of cellular structures that generate and/or transmit force.
- Mechanochemical signaling and feedback loops that control cellular metabolism and gene expression.
- Mechanobiology of cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions
- Mechanotransduction in cell division, migration, tissue homeostasis, immune defense, stem cell fate specification/differentiation, tissue patterning and cell extrusion.
- Mechanobiology of molecular, cellular and developmental processes related to cancer, neurodegeneration, inflammatory diseases.
- Mechanobiology of cellular pathologies such as centrosome amplification, whole genome doubling, nuclear envelope abnormalities, oncogenic transformation and senescence.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

11 November 2018 Abstract
11 March 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

11 November 2018 Abstract
11 March 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top
);