Research Topic

Food, Media and the Environment - Cultures, Practices, Policies

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About this Research Topic

The handling of different environmental risks has become an evermore present feature in contemporary society because the challenges caused by climate change are among the globe’s most pressing issues. Climate change is caused by a number of factors, linked to political decisions as well as and human behaviour and choices we make in our everyday life. The issue of food, particularly the impact of contemporary meat production and consumption, has frequently been pointed to as a major contributor to the crisis and a potential site for ameliorating it.

Food relates to fundamental values in all cultures, and is an important part of several UN goals for sustainable development, such as freedom from hunger, good health and well-being, responsible production and consumption, and climate action. We are interested in how food issues are communicated and framed in relation to the discourse of sustainable development and climate change.

This Research Topic is concerned with the mediated communication of food and its ecological implications. Addressing the issue of food and media also puts a particular spotlight on the role of citizens and consumers. In much discourse, they are identified as the responsible party in the environmental impact of food. This tendency can be seen in environmental discourse in general but is particularly clear in the case of food consumption.

We welcome contributions in the wide range of problems concerning food discourses with a particular focus on mediated environmental communication addressing different parts of the communication chain, i.e. studies of media production and content as well as studies of audiences/consumers and the way they engage with these issues (or do not). We also wish to address the relationship between, politics, media, science, and the public.

The field of Environmental Communication has grown at about the same pace as the problem of climate change has been acknowledged globally as a major problem of our time. This Research Topic welcomes contributions from Science and Environmental Communication scholars with different perspectives on food, media and the environment.

Possible themes:
1. Food consumption and everyday life (health aspects)
2. Food journalism
3. Food and popular culture (life style, cooking programs, contests)
4. Food and risk
5. Food and Gene Modified Organisms (GMO)
6. Food and waste
7. Food production and climate change impact


Keywords: Food, Media, Climate change, Framing, Consumption


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The handling of different environmental risks has become an evermore present feature in contemporary society because the challenges caused by climate change are among the globe’s most pressing issues. Climate change is caused by a number of factors, linked to political decisions as well as and human behaviour and choices we make in our everyday life. The issue of food, particularly the impact of contemporary meat production and consumption, has frequently been pointed to as a major contributor to the crisis and a potential site for ameliorating it.

Food relates to fundamental values in all cultures, and is an important part of several UN goals for sustainable development, such as freedom from hunger, good health and well-being, responsible production and consumption, and climate action. We are interested in how food issues are communicated and framed in relation to the discourse of sustainable development and climate change.

This Research Topic is concerned with the mediated communication of food and its ecological implications. Addressing the issue of food and media also puts a particular spotlight on the role of citizens and consumers. In much discourse, they are identified as the responsible party in the environmental impact of food. This tendency can be seen in environmental discourse in general but is particularly clear in the case of food consumption.

We welcome contributions in the wide range of problems concerning food discourses with a particular focus on mediated environmental communication addressing different parts of the communication chain, i.e. studies of media production and content as well as studies of audiences/consumers and the way they engage with these issues (or do not). We also wish to address the relationship between, politics, media, science, and the public.

The field of Environmental Communication has grown at about the same pace as the problem of climate change has been acknowledged globally as a major problem of our time. This Research Topic welcomes contributions from Science and Environmental Communication scholars with different perspectives on food, media and the environment.

Possible themes:
1. Food consumption and everyday life (health aspects)
2. Food journalism
3. Food and popular culture (life style, cooking programs, contests)
4. Food and risk
5. Food and Gene Modified Organisms (GMO)
6. Food and waste
7. Food production and climate change impact


Keywords: Food, Media, Climate change, Framing, Consumption


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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