Research Topic

The use of Biomaterials with Stem and Precursor Cells in Diseases of the Central Nervous System; A Step to Clinical Trials

About this Research Topic

The term biomaterial refers to having materials of non-biological origin used in the manufacture of devices that interact with biological systems. The use of biomaterials and stem cells has been shown as an alternative with great therapeutic potential, arousing the interest of the scientific community in recent years, and promoting the proposal of new targets in complex pathologies and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS). The use of stem cells has allowed us to discover and describe the mechanisms behind the beneficial activities of cell therapy in human diseases, through experimental approaches to improve the health of patients, transplantation of autologous and heterologous cells from different cells, embryonic cells, adult stem or induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells.

The improvement of biomaterials of natural or synthetic origin, biocompatible and with biomechanical characteristics, similar to central nervous tissue, has been evaluated in experimental models of traumatic, vascular or neurodegenerative pathologies with promising results leading to recovery from nervous system injury. Its combination with stem cells represents a synergy in the search and development of innovative therapeutic strategies in the area of nanomedicine, cell therapy and neurorehabilitation.

The interplay between biomaterials with stem cells as a therapeutic strategy for neurorehabilitation, is considered necessary in the restoration and reconnection of pathologies and lesions of the central nervous system, since it has been shown to favor or promote an increase in plasticity, synaptogenesis and the establishment of new neural connections.

With this Research Topic, our aim is to provide the latest advances in translational research, a frontier in clinical trials. Furthermore, we aim to reveal the latest advances in research conducted with biomaterials and stem cells or other precursor cells in pathologies that lead to neuronal damage such as Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders, Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke or gliomas.
We encourage researchers to submit articles addressing all questions related to the interplay between biomaterials of different composition with different cell types of CNS, in the different pathologies requiring neurorehabilitation, analysing potential results that lead to the development of clinical trials.

We welcome research papers, as well as review papers, covering the following topics of interest:
- Evaluation of interaction between different biomaterials and different cell types, such as: embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, adult non-neural stem cells, precursor cells from different CNS strains, IPS cells, etc., in relation to their physio-chemical characteristics.
- The role of different biomaterials in the growth and proliferation of neural stem cells.
- Access pathways from biomaterials to the CNS.
- Biomaterials in the CNS and the immune response, viability and/or function of cells transplanted into the biomaterial.
- Monitoring of cell migration into the biomaterial.
- Design and methodology of potential clinical trials to aid neurorehabilitation.


Keywords: Stem Cells, Cell Therapy, Biomaterials, CNS Injury, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Gliomas, Stroke


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The term biomaterial refers to having materials of non-biological origin used in the manufacture of devices that interact with biological systems. The use of biomaterials and stem cells has been shown as an alternative with great therapeutic potential, arousing the interest of the scientific community in recent years, and promoting the proposal of new targets in complex pathologies and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS). The use of stem cells has allowed us to discover and describe the mechanisms behind the beneficial activities of cell therapy in human diseases, through experimental approaches to improve the health of patients, transplantation of autologous and heterologous cells from different cells, embryonic cells, adult stem or induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells.

The improvement of biomaterials of natural or synthetic origin, biocompatible and with biomechanical characteristics, similar to central nervous tissue, has been evaluated in experimental models of traumatic, vascular or neurodegenerative pathologies with promising results leading to recovery from nervous system injury. Its combination with stem cells represents a synergy in the search and development of innovative therapeutic strategies in the area of nanomedicine, cell therapy and neurorehabilitation.

The interplay between biomaterials with stem cells as a therapeutic strategy for neurorehabilitation, is considered necessary in the restoration and reconnection of pathologies and lesions of the central nervous system, since it has been shown to favor or promote an increase in plasticity, synaptogenesis and the establishment of new neural connections.

With this Research Topic, our aim is to provide the latest advances in translational research, a frontier in clinical trials. Furthermore, we aim to reveal the latest advances in research conducted with biomaterials and stem cells or other precursor cells in pathologies that lead to neuronal damage such as Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders, Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke or gliomas.
We encourage researchers to submit articles addressing all questions related to the interplay between biomaterials of different composition with different cell types of CNS, in the different pathologies requiring neurorehabilitation, analysing potential results that lead to the development of clinical trials.

We welcome research papers, as well as review papers, covering the following topics of interest:
- Evaluation of interaction between different biomaterials and different cell types, such as: embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, adult non-neural stem cells, precursor cells from different CNS strains, IPS cells, etc., in relation to their physio-chemical characteristics.
- The role of different biomaterials in the growth and proliferation of neural stem cells.
- Access pathways from biomaterials to the CNS.
- Biomaterials in the CNS and the immune response, viability and/or function of cells transplanted into the biomaterial.
- Monitoring of cell migration into the biomaterial.
- Design and methodology of potential clinical trials to aid neurorehabilitation.


Keywords: Stem Cells, Cell Therapy, Biomaterials, CNS Injury, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Gliomas, Stroke


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

19 August 2019 Abstract
02 December 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

19 August 2019 Abstract
02 December 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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