Research Topic

Biomimicry in 3D Nanomaterial Design: Implications for Regenerative Medicine

About this Research Topic

Through years of evolution, natural processes have gradually been perfected to become functionally efficient, exhibiting impressive and desirable traits such as robustness, self-organization and self-healing capacity. For this reason, the concepts of bioinspiration or biomimicry, that involve the transfer or implementation of principles from nature, have gained significant traction. In particular, biomimicry holds significant promise within the engineering domain as a strategy to overcome structural challenges and functional limitations in biomaterial design, synthesis and implementation.

Using natural processes as models, or employing biological molecules as building blocks, these biomimicry approaches have demonstrated clear advantages over relying on purely synthetic routes and inorganic components. Mimicking the native nanostructures present in tissues for regenerative medicine purposes or matching the nano-composition of biological entities to optimize function, has already shown great promise in the bioengineering field and is anticipated to advance several interdisciplinary fields in research and medicine. Different scaffolds or bulk materials have been efficiently functionalized at the nanoscale introducing versatile properties. From the simple modification of the nano-topography, to the introduction of grafting moieties using orthogonal chemistry, several examples showed the possibility to drastically change the bulk material properties modifying only the nano-structure, such as better mechanical features, as well as permeability, cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation.

This Research Topic aims to cover the latest advances in the design, engineering and manufacturing of bioinspired and biomimetic nanomaterials for regenerative medicine. We hope it will provide a comprehensive analysis of the field of biomaterial design by leveraging the lessons learned from a decade of discoveries in the areas of chemical synthesis and cellular and immune response to bioinspired nanomaterials. Therefore, this Research Topic wants to present a comprehensive plethora of biomimetic nanomaterials: from synthetic to natural, injectable or implantable, that exhibit regenerative potential.

Subtopics to be covered include, but are not limited to:

- Design and synthesis of biomimetic nano-scaffolds for regenerative medicine
- Nano-fabrication of hydrogels to regulate cells’ behavior
- Fabrication of biomimetic, electrospun nano-constructs for tissue regeneration
- Nano-functionalization or nanopattering of bulk materials to change cells’ fate
- Mimicking the nanomechanics to induce cells’ respond

In silico, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies are welcome to prove the effect of biomimetic nanomaterials are largely encouraged. Both full original articles and review manuscripts will be considered.


Keywords: Biomimicry, Bioinspired Nanomaterials, Natural Materials, Medical Tools, Theragnostic, Nanomaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Through years of evolution, natural processes have gradually been perfected to become functionally efficient, exhibiting impressive and desirable traits such as robustness, self-organization and self-healing capacity. For this reason, the concepts of bioinspiration or biomimicry, that involve the transfer or implementation of principles from nature, have gained significant traction. In particular, biomimicry holds significant promise within the engineering domain as a strategy to overcome structural challenges and functional limitations in biomaterial design, synthesis and implementation.

Using natural processes as models, or employing biological molecules as building blocks, these biomimicry approaches have demonstrated clear advantages over relying on purely synthetic routes and inorganic components. Mimicking the native nanostructures present in tissues for regenerative medicine purposes or matching the nano-composition of biological entities to optimize function, has already shown great promise in the bioengineering field and is anticipated to advance several interdisciplinary fields in research and medicine. Different scaffolds or bulk materials have been efficiently functionalized at the nanoscale introducing versatile properties. From the simple modification of the nano-topography, to the introduction of grafting moieties using orthogonal chemistry, several examples showed the possibility to drastically change the bulk material properties modifying only the nano-structure, such as better mechanical features, as well as permeability, cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation.

This Research Topic aims to cover the latest advances in the design, engineering and manufacturing of bioinspired and biomimetic nanomaterials for regenerative medicine. We hope it will provide a comprehensive analysis of the field of biomaterial design by leveraging the lessons learned from a decade of discoveries in the areas of chemical synthesis and cellular and immune response to bioinspired nanomaterials. Therefore, this Research Topic wants to present a comprehensive plethora of biomimetic nanomaterials: from synthetic to natural, injectable or implantable, that exhibit regenerative potential.

Subtopics to be covered include, but are not limited to:

- Design and synthesis of biomimetic nano-scaffolds for regenerative medicine
- Nano-fabrication of hydrogels to regulate cells’ behavior
- Fabrication of biomimetic, electrospun nano-constructs for tissue regeneration
- Nano-functionalization or nanopattering of bulk materials to change cells’ fate
- Mimicking the nanomechanics to induce cells’ respond

In silico, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies are welcome to prove the effect of biomimetic nanomaterials are largely encouraged. Both full original articles and review manuscripts will be considered.


Keywords: Biomimicry, Bioinspired Nanomaterials, Natural Materials, Medical Tools, Theragnostic, Nanomaterials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

11 November 2019 Abstract
10 March 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

11 November 2019 Abstract
10 March 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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