Research Topic

Engineered Adjuvants and Carriers for an Animal Infectious Disease Vaccine

About this Research Topic

Infectious diseases in livestock are a major threat to global animal health and welfare. In addition, contamination of our animal-sourced food with infectious disease is an international food safety issue. Among numerous strategies, vaccination is the most effective approach to control, as well as prevent, disease. Live vaccines, though effective in inducing immunity, pose the risk of reversal to virulence. Available commercially killed/inactivated or subunit vaccines are in injectable form and induce a weak secretory immunity. Since the primary entry gateway for most infectious diseases is nasal or oral, delivering vaccines through these routes is highly effective. Oral and nasally delivered, unprotected vaccines have a chance to expose various biological barriers, such as the stomach acidic environment and being cleared by nasal mucociliary action. However, non-adjuvanted animal killed/inactivated or subunit vaccines are less immunogenic when delivered via nasal and oral routes. Similarly, unprotected antigens have a chance to be quickly cleared in the nasal and small intestinal areas. These vaccines need a suitable adjuvant and vaccine delivery carrier to trigger an adequate immune response.

To enhance vaccine immunogenicity, suitable adjuvants and targeted antigen delivery carriers are needed. While available, animal vaccine adjuvants and carriers are limited. It is necessary that we formulate novel strategies to develop non-toxic adjuvants and less immunogenic vaccine delivery carriers to treat various animal diseases.

The scope of this Research Topics is to develop and understand novel adjuvants and vaccine delivery carriers for animal infectious disease. The specific research themes are:

• Novel adjuvants for animal infectious disease
• Understating molecular and immunological mechanism of adjuvants
• Adjuvanted animal vaccine delivery carriers
• Strategy to develop an effective vaccine carriers
• Molecular mechanism of vaccine delivery carriers
• Targeted vaccine delivery

Drs. Renu, Wilson and Tabynov hold patents related to animal disease and animal disease vaccines. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Infectious Diseases, Livestock, Adjuvants, Vaccines, Immunity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Infectious diseases in livestock are a major threat to global animal health and welfare. In addition, contamination of our animal-sourced food with infectious disease is an international food safety issue. Among numerous strategies, vaccination is the most effective approach to control, as well as prevent, disease. Live vaccines, though effective in inducing immunity, pose the risk of reversal to virulence. Available commercially killed/inactivated or subunit vaccines are in injectable form and induce a weak secretory immunity. Since the primary entry gateway for most infectious diseases is nasal or oral, delivering vaccines through these routes is highly effective. Oral and nasally delivered, unprotected vaccines have a chance to expose various biological barriers, such as the stomach acidic environment and being cleared by nasal mucociliary action. However, non-adjuvanted animal killed/inactivated or subunit vaccines are less immunogenic when delivered via nasal and oral routes. Similarly, unprotected antigens have a chance to be quickly cleared in the nasal and small intestinal areas. These vaccines need a suitable adjuvant and vaccine delivery carrier to trigger an adequate immune response.

To enhance vaccine immunogenicity, suitable adjuvants and targeted antigen delivery carriers are needed. While available, animal vaccine adjuvants and carriers are limited. It is necessary that we formulate novel strategies to develop non-toxic adjuvants and less immunogenic vaccine delivery carriers to treat various animal diseases.

The scope of this Research Topics is to develop and understand novel adjuvants and vaccine delivery carriers for animal infectious disease. The specific research themes are:

• Novel adjuvants for animal infectious disease
• Understating molecular and immunological mechanism of adjuvants
• Adjuvanted animal vaccine delivery carriers
• Strategy to develop an effective vaccine carriers
• Molecular mechanism of vaccine delivery carriers
• Targeted vaccine delivery

Drs. Renu, Wilson and Tabynov hold patents related to animal disease and animal disease vaccines. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regard to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Infectious Diseases, Livestock, Adjuvants, Vaccines, Immunity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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