Research Topic

Hybrids Part A: Hybrids for Tissue Regeneration

About this Research Topic

Hybrids, consisting of two constituents (primarily inorganic and organic phases) at the nanometer or molecular level, have recently emerged as advanced biomaterials for regenerative medicine applications. Hybrids usually show characteristics in between the two original phases or even exhibit unique physical, chemical, mechanical and biological properties. Many attempts have been dedicated to design and synthesize novel hybrid biomaterials with several concurrent features, such as favorable mechanical properties for tissue growth support, and desired biological response to favor the regeneration of damaged tissues.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to report promising, recent, and novel research in the field of hybrids for tissue regeneration applications. Hybrids are attracting increasing attention as new biomaterials and also as promising building blocks of advanced medical devices for the regeneration of various tissues (e.g. bone, skin). However, many challenges still exist, for example:

- Rational design of inorganic/organic phases toward controlled overall mechanical and biological properties
- Controlling the biodegradation of hybrids
- Modulating inflammatory response induced by hybrids
- Controlling the osteogenic, angiogenic and antimicrobial properties of hybrids

Types of manuscripts to be featured mainly include Original Research and Perspective articles. Review articles that describe the current state-of-the-art in hybrids for specific tissue regeneration (e.g. hybrids for bone regeneration and wound healing) are welcome.

Topics to be investigated in this collection may include (but are not limited to):

• Novel approaches for hybrids synthesis
• Bioactive hybrids (e.g. based on bioactive ceramics, bioactive glasses and biostable or biodegradable polymers; based on substances of natural origin) for tissue regeneration
• Hybrid nanoparticles as building blocks of scaffolds in tissue engineering
• Multifunctional hybrid coatings (e.g. antibacterial, pro-osteogenic, angiogenic, self-healing)
• Cellular response and protein interaction with hybrids
In vivo behaviour of hybrids in animal models


Keywords: Multifunctional Hybrids, Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering, Nanohybrids, Cell Response


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Hybrids, consisting of two constituents (primarily inorganic and organic phases) at the nanometer or molecular level, have recently emerged as advanced biomaterials for regenerative medicine applications. Hybrids usually show characteristics in between the two original phases or even exhibit unique physical, chemical, mechanical and biological properties. Many attempts have been dedicated to design and synthesize novel hybrid biomaterials with several concurrent features, such as favorable mechanical properties for tissue growth support, and desired biological response to favor the regeneration of damaged tissues.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to report promising, recent, and novel research in the field of hybrids for tissue regeneration applications. Hybrids are attracting increasing attention as new biomaterials and also as promising building blocks of advanced medical devices for the regeneration of various tissues (e.g. bone, skin). However, many challenges still exist, for example:

- Rational design of inorganic/organic phases toward controlled overall mechanical and biological properties
- Controlling the biodegradation of hybrids
- Modulating inflammatory response induced by hybrids
- Controlling the osteogenic, angiogenic and antimicrobial properties of hybrids

Types of manuscripts to be featured mainly include Original Research and Perspective articles. Review articles that describe the current state-of-the-art in hybrids for specific tissue regeneration (e.g. hybrids for bone regeneration and wound healing) are welcome.

Topics to be investigated in this collection may include (but are not limited to):

• Novel approaches for hybrids synthesis
• Bioactive hybrids (e.g. based on bioactive ceramics, bioactive glasses and biostable or biodegradable polymers; based on substances of natural origin) for tissue regeneration
• Hybrid nanoparticles as building blocks of scaffolds in tissue engineering
• Multifunctional hybrid coatings (e.g. antibacterial, pro-osteogenic, angiogenic, self-healing)
• Cellular response and protein interaction with hybrids
In vivo behaviour of hybrids in animal models


Keywords: Multifunctional Hybrids, Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering, Nanohybrids, Cell Response


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

19 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

19 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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