Research Topic

Drug Repurposing for COVID-19 Therapy

About this Research Topic

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for variable clinical manifestations, ranging from an asymptomatic infection to severe respiratory distress syndrome, with a high risk of death in some patients. To date no specific antiviral drug has been approved, and the treatment of the disease mainly relies on medicines treating symptoms and supportive care. It has been demonstrated that one of the most important mechanisms behind the deterioration of the clinical condition is a cytokine storm, induced by high levels of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as Interferon-α, Interferon-β and IL-6. Therefore, reducing the release or activity of pro-inflammatory mediators could prevent or reverse the cytokine storm syndrome, thereby improving the condition of patients. Moreover, a severe symptomatology can also be complicated by coagulopathy, supporting the use of anticoagulant treatment. Conclusive data about efficacy and safety of medicines in clinical trial for COVID-19 are still not available.

Effective and safe treatments for COVID-19 are urgently needed. A considerable amount of molecules has been employed to treat patients according to preliminary preclinical and clinical results. Most of the ongoing clinical trials have been designed to test well-known (or anyway already approved) drugs.

Drug repurposing allows to rapidly study treatments, at lower costs and with reduced risk of failure as the safety profile of the medicine is typically well-established. Developing new drugs is obviously a lengthy process, thus unfeasible to face the immediate global emergency. At present, well-known anti-infective molecules (cloroquine/hydroxychloroquine, anti-retroviral drugs, anti-influenza, antibacterial agents), anti-rheumatic/anti-cytokine release syndrome drugs, antithrombotic agents are under clinical development for COVID-19.

The aim of this Research Topic is to explore the role of repurposed drugs with different mechanism of action (e.g. anti-viral, immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory activity, pleiotropic activity) for COVID-19 and to reflect on regulatory challenges for drug repurposing in the pandemic era.


Keywords: COVID-19, repurposed drugs, anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, pleiotropic activity, drug repurposing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for variable clinical manifestations, ranging from an asymptomatic infection to severe respiratory distress syndrome, with a high risk of death in some patients. To date no specific antiviral drug has been approved, and the treatment of the disease mainly relies on medicines treating symptoms and supportive care. It has been demonstrated that one of the most important mechanisms behind the deterioration of the clinical condition is a cytokine storm, induced by high levels of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as Interferon-α, Interferon-β and IL-6. Therefore, reducing the release or activity of pro-inflammatory mediators could prevent or reverse the cytokine storm syndrome, thereby improving the condition of patients. Moreover, a severe symptomatology can also be complicated by coagulopathy, supporting the use of anticoagulant treatment. Conclusive data about efficacy and safety of medicines in clinical trial for COVID-19 are still not available.

Effective and safe treatments for COVID-19 are urgently needed. A considerable amount of molecules has been employed to treat patients according to preliminary preclinical and clinical results. Most of the ongoing clinical trials have been designed to test well-known (or anyway already approved) drugs.

Drug repurposing allows to rapidly study treatments, at lower costs and with reduced risk of failure as the safety profile of the medicine is typically well-established. Developing new drugs is obviously a lengthy process, thus unfeasible to face the immediate global emergency. At present, well-known anti-infective molecules (cloroquine/hydroxychloroquine, anti-retroviral drugs, anti-influenza, antibacterial agents), anti-rheumatic/anti-cytokine release syndrome drugs, antithrombotic agents are under clinical development for COVID-19.

The aim of this Research Topic is to explore the role of repurposed drugs with different mechanism of action (e.g. anti-viral, immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory activity, pleiotropic activity) for COVID-19 and to reflect on regulatory challenges for drug repurposing in the pandemic era.


Keywords: COVID-19, repurposed drugs, anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, pleiotropic activity, drug repurposing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

20 June 2020 Abstract
20 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

20 June 2020 Abstract
20 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..