Research Topic

Dysregulated Protein Homeostasis in the Aging Organism

About this Research Topic

Protein homeostasis is defined as the fine-tuned balance between protein synthesis, protein folding and protein degradation at the level of functional proteins. In healthy cells and organisms this balance is carefully maintained through regulatory quality control systems, including protein degradation through ...

Protein homeostasis is defined as the fine-tuned balance between protein synthesis, protein folding and protein degradation at the level of functional proteins. In healthy cells and organisms this balance is carefully maintained through regulatory quality control systems, including protein degradation through the ubiquitin proteasome system, autophagy, and protein folding mechanisms. Aging tightly correlates with changes in protein homeostasis, the accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins, and changes in post-translational modified proteins. This accumulation of damaged proteins arises from defects in protein degradation or dysfunctional protein folding mechanisms and is associated with several age-related diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

This Research Topic aims to combine recent progress in the field of protein homeostasis with a focus on dysregulated folding and proteolysis in the aging organism. We intend to bring together different expertise in the field and by that create a better overview. We also intend to produce synergies that will be beneficial for scientific progress in this area. As an example, we plan to bring together basic research with different model organisms but also encourage contributions with distinct clinical focuses. Also of particular interest are genetic disorders that coincide with changes in protein homeostasis and/or premature ageing.

Topics that we wish to cover include, but are not limited to:

(1) dysregulation of autophagy in the ageing organism
(2) dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the ageing organism
(3) dysregulation of protein folding mechanisms in the ageing organism

Additionally, we are interested in enzymatic and non-enzymatic protein modifications that accumulate over time and are associated with dysregulated protein homeostasis. These post-translational modifications include, but are not limited to, oxidation, glycation, ubiquitination, acetylation, and glycosylation. We encourage contributions in the form of Brief Research Reports, Methods, Mini Reviews, Original Research, Perspective, and Reviews.


Dr. Niki Chondrogianni holds patents relating to biomolecules with anti-aging properties. All other Topic Editors declare no competing interests.


Keywords: Protein homeostasis, aging, ubiquitin modification system, autophagy, molecular chaperones


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 February 2021 Manuscript
15 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 February 2021 Manuscript
15 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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