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The cell cycle involving four sequential phases that go from quiescence (G0 phase) to proliferation (G1, S, G2, and M phases) and back to quiescence is a set of organized and monitored events responsible for proper cell division into two daughter cells. Given the relevance of the processes in which cell ...

The cell cycle involving four sequential phases that go from quiescence (G0 phase) to proliferation (G1, S, G2, and M phases) and back to quiescence is a set of organized and monitored events responsible for proper cell division into two daughter cells. Given the relevance of the processes in which cell proliferation is involved, the regulation of the cell cycle is of paramount importance for multicellular organisms. The aberrant regulation of the cell cycle has played critical roles in the proliferation and progression of tumors, and currently many small-molecule anti-cancer drugs are targeting molecules involved in cell cycle regulation. Cell division is composed of a complex network of interactions between proteins, metabolites, and various molecules in the microenvironment, which is precisely organized to enable cell proliferation only under specific and appropriate conditions. It mainly includes several signaling pathways and control mechanisms. In the collaborative variations of many molecules that affect the cell cycle, three main factors have been identified: 1. the mechanism of the cell cycle protein; 2. metabolic enzymes and related metabolites; 3. reactive-oxygen species (ROS) and cell redox state. However, the roles of emerging molecules and key players in the cell cycle and related regulatory mechanisms are not yet well-established.

This Research Topic is intended to cover the regulatory mechanisms of the cell cycle during tumor proliferation, especially in transcription and post-transcription levels mediated by emerging molecules (Circular RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, and proteins et.al), so to further advance our knowledge on tumor proliferation mechanisms and to provide a broader forum for scientific discussion on cell cycle regulators. Studies reporting recent advances on innovative cancer therapies targeting cell cycle are also welcome.

We welcome submissions of Original Research, Review, and Mini Review. The subject areas of interest include but are not limited to:
• Cell cycle proteins expression in cancer cells
• The regulation of cell cycle proteins
• Functions of cell cycle regulators in cancer proliferation and progression
• The relationship among cell cycle proteins, regulators and emerging molecules (Circular RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, and proteins et.al)
• Different pathways of tumor proliferation and progression regulated by molecules as regulators
• The application of emerging molecules as therapeutic targets and diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers


We would like to acknowledge Dr. Jie Li from Nanjing Medical University who has acted as coordinator and has contributed to the preparation of the proposal for this Research Topic.

Keywords: Cell Proliferation, Cancers, Cell Cycle Proteins, Molecular Regulation, Clinical Applications


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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