Research Topic

Tremor Syndromes: Current Concepts and Future Perspectives

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About this Research Topic

Tremors are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Tremor is defined as “the rhythmic and involuntary
oscillatory movement of a body part around one or more joints”. Tremors have varying aetiologies; hence,
classifying them appropriately seems crucial to identify underlying causes. Recently, there ...

Tremors are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Tremor is defined as “the rhythmic and involuntary
oscillatory movement of a body part around one or more joints”. Tremors have varying aetiologies; hence,
classifying them appropriately seems crucial to identify underlying causes. Recently, there have been
significant advances in this field: the classification of tremors has been updated, and many genes involved
in the aetiology of “dystonic tremor” have been identified. Also, there have been advances in the field of
electrophysiology and neuroimaging of patients with tremor, leading to a better understanding of its
pathophysiology. Finally, new modalities for the treatment of tremors have been recently introduced in
clinical practice: for instance, magnetic resonance-guided focussed ultrasound has shown promising results
on essential tremor patients.

In this Research Topic, we aim to better understand the new classification of tremor proposed in 2018. In
this consensus classification the new term “Essential tremor-plus” has been proposed. This type of tremor
has clinical features similar to “essential tremor”, but it also presents other neurological signs such as
questionable dystonia, cognitive problems, ataxia, and “rest tremor”. Despite the improvement, many grey
areas remain unaddressed by this classification. Another major advancement in the field is a better
understanding of “dystonic tremor”.
Recent publications report the use of neurophysiological techniques to differentiate “dystonic tremor” and “essential tremor-plus” patients. Also, the use of techniques such as voxel-based structural and functional MRI have been reported to study different types of tremor.
Nonetheless, it is not clear if these techniques can be useful/applied in a clinical setting. There have been
advances also in the understanding of tremor at the molecular level: researchers have identified many new
genes involved in “dystonic tremor” (e.g. ANO-3 and GNAL). However, further biomarkers are needed to
differentiate among various types of tremor.

This Research Topic welcomes original research articles on different types of tremors. Systematic review
articles that present a synthesis of previous research on the diagnosis and treatment of tremor are also
welcome. Finally, we encourage the submission of review and mini review articles that focus on different
aspects of tremor, investigations, treatment and recent developments presenting a complete overview of
the state of the art and not merely summarizing the literature.

Submissions on the following themes are strongly encouraged:
• Classification of tremor
• Neurophysiology of tremor
• Neuroimaging of tremor
• Epidemiology of tremor
• Treatment of tremor


Keywords: Tremor, Dystonia, Neurophysiology, Neuroimaging, Neurogenetics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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